Dictionary.com

vibration

[ vahy-brey-shuhn ]
/ vaɪˈbreɪ ʃən /
Save This Word!
See synonyms for: vibration / vibrations on Thesaurus.com

noun

the act of vibrating.
the state of being vibrated.
Physics.
  1. the oscillating, reciprocating, or other periodic motion of a rigid or elastic body or medium forced from a position or state of equilibrium.
  2. the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound.
an instance of vibratory motion; oscillation; quiver; tremor.
a supernatural emanation, bearing good or ill, that is sensed by or revealed to those attuned to the occult.
Often vibrations. Informal. a general emotional feeling one has from another person or a place, situation, etc.: I usually get good vibrations from him.

QUIZZES

QUIZ YOURSELF ON AFFECT VS. EFFECT!

In effect, this quiz will prove whether or not you have the skills to know the difference between “affect” and “effect.”
Question 1 of 7
The rainy weather could not ________ my elated spirits on my graduation day.

Origin of vibration

1645–55; 1965–70 for def. 6; <Latin vibrātiōn- (stem of vibrātiō). See vibrate, -ion
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for vibration

vibration
/ (vaɪˈbreɪʃən) /

noun

the act or an instance of vibrating
physics
  1. a periodic motion about an equilibrium position, such as the regular displacement of air in the propagation of sound
  2. a single cycle of such a motion
the process or state of vibrating or being vibrated
vibrational, adjectivevibrationless, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for vibration

vibration
[ vī-brāshən ]

A rapid oscillation of a particle, particles, or elastic solid or surface, back and forth across a central position.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Essays. Emails. Everything. Get Help Now!