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voucher

[ vou-cher ]
/ ˈvaʊ tʃər /
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noun
verb (used with object)
to pay for, guarantee, or authorize by voucher.
to prepare a voucher for.
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Origin of voucher

First recorded in 1525–35; from Anglo-French voucher “to vouch”; originally a French infinitive used as noun but now taken as verb vouch + -er1

OTHER WORDS FROM voucher

vouch·er·a·ble, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use voucher in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for voucher

voucher
/ (ˈvaʊtʃə) /

noun
a document serving as evidence for some claimed transaction, as the receipt or expenditure of money
British a ticket or card serving as a substitute for casha gift voucher
a person or thing that vouches for the truth of some statement, etc
any of certain documents that various groups of British nationals born outside Britain must obtain in order to settle in Britain
English law obsolete
  1. the summoning into court of a person to warrant a title to property
  2. the person so summoned

Word Origin for voucher

C16: from Anglo-French, noun use of Old French voucher to summon; see vouch
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for voucher

voucher

A credit of a certain monetary value that can be used only for a specified purpose, such as to pay for housing or for food. Food stamps are a kind of voucher.

notes for voucher

Some economists believe that goods and services supplied by the government would be provided more efficiently if vouchers that could be spent only on such goods and services were given to citizens, and private business competed to provide those goods and services.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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