warder

1
[wawr-der]
See more synonyms for warder on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a person who guards something, as a doorkeeper or caretaker.
  2. a soldier or other person set to guard an entrance.
  3. Chiefly British. an official having charge of prisoners in a jail.

Origin of warder

1
1350–1400; Middle English warder(e) (see ward, -er1); compare Anglo-French wardere < Middle English
Related formsward·er·ship, noun

warder

2
[wawr-der]
noun
  1. a truncheon or staff of office or authority, used in giving signals.

Origin of warder

2
1400–50; late Middle English < ?
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for warder

guard, turnkey, warden

Examples from the Web for warder

Contemporary Examples of warder

Historical Examples of warder

  • The prisoner, a warder on each side of him, took a step forward.

    A Nest of Spies

    Pierre Souvestre

  • The warder in charge put in an entry from the books of the prison.

    A Son of Hagar

    Sir Hall Caine

  • I became a warder with a cap white on one side and yellow on the other.

  • Then when my warder came one evening later than usual, I flew on him and felled him.

    Sir Ludar

    Talbot Baines Reed

  • The warder, and every soldier who had been on duty that night, were arrested and questioned.


British Dictionary definitions for warder

warder

1

feminine wardress

noun
  1. mainly British an officer in charge of prisoners in a jail
  2. a person who guards or has charge of something
Derived Formswardership, noun

Word Origin for warder

C14: from Anglo-French wardere, from Old French warder to guard, of Germanic origin

warder

2
noun
  1. (formerly) a staff or truncheon carried by a ruler as an emblem of authority and used to signal his wishes or intentions

Word Origin for warder

C15: perhaps from Middle English warden to ward
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for warder
n.

c.1400, "guardian of an entrance," from Anglo-French wardere "guardian," agent noun from Old North French warder "to guard" (Old French garder), of Germanic origin (see guard (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper