weigh

1
[ wey ]
/ weɪ /
|||

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

Verb Phrases


Nearby words

  1. weidman, charles,
  2. weierstrass,
  3. weierstrass approximation theorem,
  4. weifang,
  5. weigela,
  6. weigh down,
  7. weigh in,
  8. weigh on,
  9. weigh one's words,
  10. weigh up

Idioms

    weigh anchor, Nautical. to heave up a ship's anchor in preparation for getting under way.
    weigh one's words. word(def 29).

Origin of weigh

1
before 900; Middle English weghen, Old English wegan to carry, weigh; cognate with Dutch wegen, German wägen, Old Norse vega; akin to Latin vehere

Related forms
Can be confusedway weigh weight

weigh

2
[ wey ]
/ weɪ /

Idioms

under weigh, Nautical. in motion; under way.

Origin of weigh

2
1775–85; spelling variant of way1 by association with weigh anchor

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for weigh


British Dictionary definitions for weigh

weigh

1
/ (weɪ) /

verb


Derived Formsweighable, adjectiveweigher, noun

Word Origin for weigh

Old English wegan; related to Old Frisian wega, Old Norse vega, Gothic gawigan, German wiegen

noun

under weigh a variant spelling of under way

Word Origin for weigh

C18: variation due to the influence of phrases such as to weigh anchor

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for weigh

weigh

v.

Old English wegan "find the weight of, have weight, lift, carry," from Proto-Germanic *weganan (cf. Old Saxon wegan, Old Frisian wega, Dutch wegen "to weigh," Old Norse vega, Old High German wegan "to move, carry, weigh," German wiegen "to weigh"), from PIE *wegh- "to move" (cf. Sanskrit vahati "carries, conveys," vahitram "vessel, ship;" Avestan vazaiti "he leads, draws;" Greek okhos "carriage;" Latin vehere "to carry, convey;" Old Church Slavonic vesti "to carry, convey;" Lithuanian vezu "to carry, convey;" Old Irish fecht "campaign, journey").

The original sense was of motion, which led to that of lifting, then to that of "measure the weight of." The older sense of "lift, carry" survives in the nautical phrase weigh anchor. Figurative sense of "to consider, ponder" (in reference to words, etc.) is recorded from mid-14c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper