Dictionary.com
QUIZ
WILL YOU SAIL OR STUMBLE ON THESE GRAMMAR QUESTIONS?
Smoothly step over to these common grammar mistakes that trip many people up. Good luck!
Question 1 of 7
Fill in the blank: I can’t figure out _____ gave me this gift.

Origin of wink

1
First recorded before 900; Middle English verb winken, Old English wincian; cognate with German winken “to wave, signal”; the noun is derivative of the verb

synonym study for wink

1. Wink, blink refer to rapid motions of the eyelid. To wink is to close and open either one or both eyelids with a rapid motion. To blink suggests a sleepy, dazed, or dazzled condition in which it is difficult to focus the eyes or see clearly: Bright sun makes one blink.

OTHER WORDS FROM wink

wink·ing·ly, adverbun·wink·ing, adjective

Other definitions for wink (2 of 2)

wink2
[ wingk ]
/ wɪŋk /

noun Games.
a disk or similar small object used in tiddlywinks.

Origin of wink

2
First recorded in 1890–95; extracted from tiddlywinks
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use wink in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for wink (1 of 2)

wink1
/ (wɪŋk) /

verb
noun

Word Origin for wink

Old English wincian; related to Old Saxon wincon, Old High German winchan, German winken to wave. See wench, winch

British Dictionary definitions for wink (2 of 2)

wink2
/ (wɪŋk) /

noun
a disc used in the game of tiddlywinks

Word Origin for wink

C20: shortened from tiddlywinks
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with wink

wink

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
FEEDBACK