Origin of wink

1
before 900; (v.) Middle English winken, Old English wincian; cognate with German winken to wave, signal; (noun) Middle English: nap, derivative of the v.
SYNONYMS FOR wink
1 Wink, blink refer to rapid motions of the eyelid. To wink is to close and open either one or both eyelids with a rapid motion. To blink suggests a sleepy, dazed, or dazzled condition in which it is difficult to focus the eyes or see clearly: Bright sun makes one blink.
4 sparkle.
Related formswink·ing·ly, adverbun·wink·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for winking

British Dictionary definitions for winking (1 of 2)

wink

1
/ (wɪŋk) /

verb

noun

Word Origin for wink

Old English wincian; related to Old Saxon wincon, Old High German winchan, German winken to wave. See wench, winch

British Dictionary definitions for winking (2 of 2)

wink

2
/ (wɪŋk) /

noun

a disc used in the game of tiddlywinks

Word Origin for wink

C20: shortened from tiddlywinks
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for winking

wink

[ wĭngk ]

v.

To close and open the eyelid of one eye deliberately, as to convey a message, signal, or suggestion.
To close and open the eyelids of both eyes; blink.

n.

A quick closing and opening of the eyelids; a blink.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with winking

wink


In addition to the idiom beginning with wink

  • wink at

also see:

  • forty winks
  • quick as a wink
  • sleep a wink
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.