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woof

1
[woo f, woof]
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noun
  1. filling(def 5).
  2. texture; fabric.
  3. British. warp(def 13).
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Origin of woof

1
before 900; Middle English oof, owf, Old English ōwef, āwef (compare gewef), equivalent to ō-, ā- a-3 + wef (akin to web); modern w- from weft, warp, weave, etc.

woof

2
[woo f]
interjection
  1. (used to imitate the bark of a dog).
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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for woof

balance, sense, fabric, nature, taste, pattern, makeup, character, surface, smoothness, consistency, touch, feeling, quality, composition, structure, screen, net, network, cord

Examples from the Web for woof

Contemporary Examples of woof

Historical Examples of woof

  • They lay far deeper, in the very warp and woof of her nature.

    Dust

    Mr. and Mrs. Haldeman-Julius

  • Of this warp and woof have all the strange patterns of Spanish life been woven.

  • And as a shuttle separates the warp from the woof, so a name distinguishes the natures of things.

  • As in a web the warp is stronger than the woof, so should the rulers be stronger than their half-educated subjects.

    Laws

    Plato

  • She looks to it that warp and woof are wrought with speed and beauty.


British Dictionary definitions for woof

woof

1
noun
  1. the crosswise yarns that fill the warp yarns in weaving; weft
  2. a woven fabric or its texture
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Word Origin for woof

Old English ōwef, from ō-, perhaps from on, + wef web (see weave); modern form influenced by warp

woof

2
interjection
  1. an imitation of the bark or growl of a dog
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verb
  1. (intr) (of dogs) to bark or growl
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for woof

n.1

"weft, texture, fabric," Old English owef, from o- "on" + wefan "to weave" (see weave). With excrescent -w- by influence of warp or weft.

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n.2

dog bark noise, first recorded 1804, echoic. Woofer "loudspeaker for bass notes" first attested 1935.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper