Word of the Day

Saturday, February 10, 2018

fiddle-footed

[ fid-l-foo t-id ]

adjective

Informal. restlessly wandering.

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What is the origin of fiddle-footed?

Fiddle-footed was first recorded in 1945-50.

how is fiddle-footed used?

Instead, they just kept moving, a pair of fiddle-footed ramblers, following the wind, until that drifting brought them out here.

Robert Coover, Ghost Town, 1998

Being fiddle-footed was its own peculiar blessing and curse at the same time.

Jon Sharpe, The Trailsman #290: Mountain Mavericks, 2005
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Friday, February 09, 2018

intersectionality

[ in-ter-sek-shuh-nal-i-tee ]

noun

the theory that the overlap of various social identities, as race, gender, sexuality, and class, contributes to the specific type ofsystemic oppression and discrimination experienced by an individual (often used attributively): Her paper uses a queer intersectionality approach.

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What is the origin of intersectionality?

Intersectionality was coined by legal scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw. It entered English in 1989.

how is intersectionality used?

Intersectionality tells us that there is no one singular experience for women because of the way gender works in conjunction with race, ethnicity, social class, and sexuality.

Anna Diamond, "Making the Invisible Visible," Slate, September 3, 2015

… flippant or vague references to “intersectionality” abound and can serve to obscure a profound critique of deeply entrenched cognitive habits that inform feminist and antiracist thinking about oppression and privilege.

Anna Carastathis, Intersectionality: Origins, Contestations, Horizons, 2016
Thursday, February 08, 2018

naissance

[ ney-suh ns ]

noun

a birth, an origination, or a growth, as that of a person, an organization, an idea, or a movement.

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What is the origin of naissance?

The English noun naissance comes from Middle French naissance, which is a derivative of the verb naître “to be born.” The French verb comes from the Vulgar Latin nāscere, a regular verb replacing the Latin deponent verb nāscī. Naissance entered English in the late 15th century. The sense of “new style, movement, or development (in the arts)” comes from a French usage of the 20th century.

how is naissance used?

If this was a period of Renaissance for Western Europe, was it not rather a Naissance for Russia?

Mary Platt Parmele, A Short History of Russia, 1899

Nina’s watchful eyes opened wider and wider as she witnessed in Eileen the naissance of an unconscious and delicate coquetry, quite unabashed, yet the more significant for that …

Robert W. Chambers, The Younger Set, 1907

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