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goad

[gohd] /goʊd/
noun
1.
a stick with a pointed or electrically charged end, for driving cattle, oxen, etc.; prod.
2.
anything that pricks or wounds like such a stick.
3.
something that encourages, urges, or drives; a stimulus.
verb (used with object)
4.
to prick or drive with, or as if with, a goad; prod; incite.
Origin of goad
900
before 900; Middle English gode, Old English gād; compare Langobardic gaida spearhead
Related forms
goadlike, adjective
ungoaded, adjective
Synonyms
4. spur, push, impel.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for goad
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • They had no rowels, but were made with a simple point like a goad, and were fastened with leathers.

    The Evolution of Fashion Florence Mary Gardiner
  • Their legal status was, as it were, a goad, spurring them on to show their horror of it.

    Fraternity John Galsworthy
  • His imperturbability always ‘had the effect of a goad upon his father’s temper.

    Australian Writers Desmond Byrne
  • To mend the sail on the yard; figuratively, to goad or remind forcibly.

    The Sailor's Word-Book William Henry Smyth
  • She is the woman who will not, consciously or unconsciously, goad her husband to money-making.

    Talks to Freshman Girls Helen Dawes Brown
  • You couldn't have got these women out of their homes without the goad of poverty.

    The Convert Elizabeth Robins
  • Only the most merciless of rowelling could goad the jaded beast out of a jog except for short spurts.

    Bloom of Cactus Robert Ames Bennet
British Dictionary definitions for goad

goad

/ɡəʊd/
noun
1.
a sharp pointed stick for urging on cattle, etc
2.
anything that acts as a spur or incitement
verb
3.
(transitive) to drive with or as if with a goad; spur; incite
Derived Forms
goadlike, adjective
Word Origin
Old English gād, of Germanic origin, related to Old English gār, Old Norse geirr spear
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for goad
n.

Old English gad "point, spearhead, arrowhead," from Proto-Germanic *gaido (cf. Lombardic gaida "spear"), from PIE *ghei- (cf. Sanskrit hetih "missile, projectile," himsati "he injures;" Avestan zaena- "weapon;" Greek khaios "shepherd's staff;" Old English gar "spear;" Old Irish gae "spear"). Figurative use is since 16c., probably from the Bible.

v.

1570s, from goad (n.); earliest use is figurative. Related: Goaded; goading.

v.

1570s, from goad (n.); earliest use is figurative. Related: Goaded; goading.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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6
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