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abate

[ uh-beyt ]
/ əˈbeɪt /
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See synonyms for: abate / abated / abating on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), a·bat·ed, a·bat·ing.
verb (used without object), a·bat·ed, a·bat·ing.
to diminish in intensity, violence, amount, etc.: The storm has abated.The pain in his shoulder finally abated.
Law. to end; become null and void.
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Origin of abate

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English, from Middle French abatre “to beat down,” equivalent to a- a-5 + batre, from Late Latin batere for Latin battuere “to beat”; a- perhaps also understood as a-3

OTHER WORDS FROM abate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use abate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for abate

abate
/ (əˈbeɪt) /

verb
to make or become less in amount, intensity, degree, etcthe storm has abated
(tr) law
  1. to remove, suppress, or terminate (a nuisance)
  2. to suspend or extinguish (a claim or action)
  3. to annul (a writ)
(intr) law (of a writ, legal action, etc) to become null and void
(tr) to subtract or deduct, as part of a price

Word Origin for abate

C14: from Old French abatre to beat down, fell
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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