assume

[ uh-soom ]
/ əˈsum /

verb (used with object), as·sumed, as·sum·ing.

verb (used without object), as·sumed, as·sum·ing.

to take something for granted; presume.

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Origin of assume

First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English (from Anglo-French assumer ), from Latin assūmere “to take to, adopt,” equivalent to as- “toward” + sūmere “to take up”; see as-, consume

synonym study for assume

6. See pretend.

OTHER WORDS FROM assume

as·sum·er, nouno·ver·as·sume, verb (used with object), o·ver·as·sumed, o·ver·as·sum·ing.pre·as·sume, verb (used with object), pre·as·sumed, pre·as·sum·ing.re·as·sume, verb (used with object), re·as·sumed, re·as·sum·ing.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for assume

British Dictionary definitions for assume

assume
/ (əˈsjuːm) /

verb (tr)

(may take a clause as object) to take for granted; accept without proof; supposeto assume that someone is sane
to take upon oneself; undertake or take on or over (a position, responsibility, etc)to assume office
to pretend to; feignhe assumed indifference, although the news affected him deeply
to take or put on; adoptthe problem assumed gigantic proportions
to appropriate or usurp (power, control, etc); arrogatethe revolutionaries assumed control of the city
Christianity (of God) to take up (the soul of a believer) into heaven

Derived forms of assume

assumable, adjectiveassumer, noun

Word Origin for assume

C15: from Latin assūmere to take up, from sūmere to take up, from sub- + emere to take
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012