axiom

[ ak-see-uh m ]
/ ˈæk si əm /

noun

a self-evident truth that requires no proof.
a universally accepted principle or rule.
Logic, Mathematics. a proposition that is assumed without proof for the sake of studying the consequences that follow from it.

Origin of axiom

1475–85; < Latin axiōma < Greek: something worthy, equivalent to axiō-, variant stem of axioûn to reckon worthy + -ma resultative noun suffix
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for axiom

British Dictionary definitions for axiom

axiom

/ (ˈæksɪəm) /

noun

a generally accepted proposition or principle, sanctioned by experience; maxim
a universally established principle or law that is not a necessary truththe axioms of politics
a self-evident statement
logic maths a statement or formula that is stipulated to be true for the purpose of a chain of reasoning: the foundation of a formal deductive systemCompare assumption (def. 4)

Word Origin for axiom

C15: from Latin axiōma a principle, from Greek, from axioun to consider worthy, from axios worthy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Science definitions for axiom

axiom

[ ăksē-əm ]

A principle that is accepted as true without proof. The statement “For every two points P and Q there is a unique line that contains both P and Q” is an axiom because no other information is given about points or lines, and therefore it cannot be proven. Also called postulate
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Culture definitions for axiom

axiom

[ (ak-see-uhm) ]

In mathematics, a statement that is unproved but accepted as a basis for other statements, usually because it seems so obvious.

Note

The term axiomatic is used generally to refer to a statement so obvious that it needs no proof.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.