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bowler1

[boh-ler]
See more synonyms for bowler on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a person who bowl, especially a participant in a bowling game, as candlepins or tenpins.
  2. Cricket. the player who throws the ball to be played by the batsman.
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Origin of bowler1

First recorded in 1490–1500; bowl2 + -er1

bowler2

[boh-ler]
noun Chiefly British.
  1. derby2(def 5).
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Origin of bowler2

First recorded in 1860–65; bowl1 + -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for bowler

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Bob Pillin, in the fixed chair of the consultor, nursed his bowler on his knee.

    Five Tales

    John Galsworthy

  • “We ought to have three more fellows, at least,” said Bowler.

    Parkhurst Boys

    Talbot Baines Reed

  • He said very little would have tempted him to do it, Bowler.

    Parkhurst Boys

    Talbot Baines Reed

  • Ever since then Bowler has been the idol of the lower school.

    Parkhurst Boys

    Talbot Baines Reed

  • Never thought about that,” said Bowler; “what do you say, Gay?

    Parkhurst Boys

    Talbot Baines Reed


British Dictionary definitions for bowler

bowler1

noun
  1. one who bowls in cricket
  2. a player at the game of bowls
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bowler2

noun
  1. a stiff felt hat with a rounded crown and narrow curved brimUS and Canadian name: derby
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Word Origin

C19: named after John Bowler, 19th-century London hatter

bowler3

noun
  1. Dublin dialect a dog
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Word Origin

perhaps from b (ow-wow) + (h) owler
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bowler

n.1

"hard round hat," 1861, said to be from a J. Bowler, 19c. London hat manufacturer. A John Bowler of Surrey, hat manufacturer, was active from the 1820s to the 1840s, and a William Bowler, hat-manufacturer, of Southwark Bridge Road, Surrey, sought a patent in 1854 for "improvements in hats and other coverings for the head." But perhaps the word is simply from bowl (n.); cf. Old English heafodbolla "brainpan, skull." The earliest usages are with a lower-case b-.

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n.2

"player at bowls," c.1500.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper