Origin of brave

1475–85; < Middle French < Spanish bravo (> Italian) < Vulgar Latin *brabus for Latin barbarus barbarous
Related forms

Synonym study

1. Brave, courageous, valiant, fearless, gallant refer to confident bearing in the face of difficulties or dangers. Brave is the most comprehensive: it is especially used of that confident fortitude or daring that actively faces and endures anything threatening. Courageous implies a higher or nobler kind of bravery, especially as resulting from an inborn quality of mind or spirit that faces or endures perils or difficulties without fear and even with enthusiasm. Valiant implies a correspondence between an inner courageousness and external deeds, particularly of physical strength or endurance. Fearless implies unflinching spirit and coolness in the face of danger. Gallant implies a chivalrous, impetuous, or dashing bravery.
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Examples from the Web for brave

British Dictionary definitions for brave

brave

/ (breɪv) /

adjective

noun

a warrior of a Native American tribe
an obsolete word for bully 1

verb (tr)

Derived Formsbravely, adverbbraveness, nounbravery, noun

Word Origin for brave

C15: from French, from Italian bravo courageous, wild, perhaps ultimately from Latin barbarus barbarous
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012