broad

[ brawd ]
/ brɔd /
|||

adjective, broad·er, broad·est.

adverb

fully: He was broad awake.

noun


Nearby words

  1. bro,
  2. bro talk,
  3. bro.,
  4. broach,
  5. broaching,
  6. broad arrow,
  7. broad bean,
  8. broad church,
  9. broad construction,
  10. broad daylight

Idioms

Origin of broad

before 1000; Middle English bro(o)d, Old English brād; cognate with Dutch breed, German breit, Old Norse breithr, Gothic braiths

SYNONYMS FOR broad
1. See wide. 3. extensive, ample, vast. 5. liberal, open. 10. gross.

Related formsbroad·ish, adjectivebroad·ly, adverbo·ver·broad, adjective

Usage note

When used to refer to a woman, broad is usually perceived as insulting. The meaning “promiscuous woman” is probably the earlier sense.

Broad

[ brawd ]
/ brɔd /

noun

C(harlie) D(unbar),1887–1971, English philosopher.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for broad


British Dictionary definitions for broad

broad

/ (brɔːd) /

adjective

noun

adverb

widely or fullybroad awake
Derived Formsbroadly, adverbbroadness, noun

Word Origin for broad

Old English brād; related to Old Norse breithr, Old Frisian brēd, Old High German breit, Gothic braiths

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for broad
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with broad

broad

In addition to the idioms beginning with broad

  • broad daylight
  • broad in the beam
  • broad shoulders, have

also see:

  • can't hit the broad side of a barn
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.