Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

brooding

[broo-ding]
See more synonyms for brooding on Thesaurus.com
adjective
  1. preoccupied with depressing, morbid, or painful memories or thoughts: a brooding frame of mind.
  2. cast in subdued light so as to convey a somewhat threatening atmosphere: Dusk fell on the brooding hills.
Show More

Origin of brooding

1810–20 for def 1; 1640–50 for def 2; brood + -ing2
Related formsbrood·ing·ly, adverbnon·brood·ing, adjective, nounun·brood·ing, adjective

brood

[brood]
noun
  1. a number of young produced or hatched at one time; a family of offspring or young.
  2. a breed, species, group, or kind: The museum exhibited a brood of monumental sculptures.
Show More
verb (used with object)
  1. to sit upon (eggs) to hatch, as a bird; incubate.
  2. (of a bird) to warm, protect, or cover (young) with the wings or body.
  3. to think or worry persistently or moodily about; ponder: He brooded the problem.
Show More
verb (used without object)
  1. to sit upon eggs to be hatched, as a bird.
  2. to dwell on a subject or to meditate with morbid persistence (usually followed by over or on).
Show More
adjective
  1. kept for breeding: a brood hen.
Show More
Verb Phrases
  1. brood above/over, to cover, loom, or seem to fill the atmosphere or scene: The haunted house on the hill brooded above the village.
Show More

Origin of brood

before 1000; Middle English; Old English brōd; cognate with Dutch broed, German Brut. See breed
Related formsbrood·less, adjectiveun·brood·ed, adjective
Can be confusedbrewed brood

Synonyms

See more synonyms for brood on Thesaurus.com
2. line, stock, strain.

Synonym study

1. Brood, litter refer to young creatures. Brood is especially applied to the young of fowls and birds hatched from eggs at one time and raised under their mother's care: a brood of young turkeys. Litter is applied to a group of young animals brought forth at a birth: a litter of kittens or pups.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for brooding

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Christopher stood silent, as if brooding on what he had seen.

    Weighed and Wanting

    George MacDonald

  • The birds, silent all in the brooding of night, rise ghostly to right and left.

    The Forest

    Stewart Edward White

  • He sat with his head bent and his elbow on his knee; brooding, brooding, brooding.

    Henry Dunbar

    M. E. Braddon

  • So she prepared for the possible future, not by brooding on it, but by doing the work of the present.

    Heather and Snow

    George MacDonald

  • Kay said nothing, but a brooding anger began to fill his heart.


British Dictionary definitions for brooding

brood

noun
  1. a number of young animals, esp birds, produced at one hatching
  2. all the offspring in one family: often used jokingly or contemptuously
  3. a group of a particular kind; breed
  4. (as modifier) kept for breedinga brood mare
Show More
verb
  1. (of a bird)
    1. to sit on or hatch (eggs)
    2. (tr)to cover (young birds) protectively with the wings
  2. (when intr , often foll by on, over or upon) to ponder morbidly or persistently
Show More
Derived Formsbrooding, noun, adjectivebroodingly, adverb

Word Origin

Old English brōd; related to Middle High German bruot, Dutch broed; see breed
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for brooding

adj.

1640s, "hovering, overhanging" (as a mother bird does her nest), from present participle of brood (v.); meaning "that dwells moodily" first attested 1818 (in "Frankenstein").

Show More

n.

"action of incubating," c.1400, verbal noun from brood (v.). Figuratively (of weather, etc.) from 1805; of mental fixations by 1873. Related: Broodingly.

Show More

brood

n.

Old English brod "brood, fetus, hatchling," from Proto-Germanic *brod (cf. Middle Dutch broet, Old High German bruot, German Brut "brood"), literally "that which is hatched by heat," from *bro- "to warm, heat," from PIE *bhre- "burn, heat, incubate," from root *bhreue- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn" (see brew (v.)).

Show More

brood

v.

"sit on eggs, hatch," mid-15c., from brood (n.). The figurative meaning ("to incubate in the mind") is first recorded 1570s, from notion of "nursing" one's anger, resentment, etc. Related: Brooded; brooding.

Show More
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

brooding in Medicine

brood

(brōōd)