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canon

1
[ kan-uhn ]
/ ˈkæn ən /
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noun
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Origin of canon

1
First recorded before 900; Middle English, Old English, from Latin, from Greek kanṓn “measuring rod, rule,” akin to kánna “cane”; see origin at cane

synonym study for canon

3-5. See principle.

OTHER WORDS FROM canon

can·on·like, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH canon

cannon, canon

Other definitions for canon (2 of 2)

canon2
[ kan-uhn ]
/ ˈkæn ən /

noun
one of a body of dignitaries or prebendaries attached to a cathedral or a collegiate church; a member of the chapter of a cathedral or a collegiate church.
Roman Catholic Church. one of the members (canons regular ) of certain religious orders.

Origin of canon

2
1150–1200; Middle English; back formation from Old English canōnic (one) under rule <Medieval Latin canōnicus,Latin: of or under rule <Greek kanōnikós.See canon1, -ic
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use canon in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for canon (1 of 3)

canon1
/ (ˈkænən) /

noun

Word Origin for canon

Old English, from Latin, from Greek kanōn rule, rod for measuring, standard; related to kanna reed, cane 1

British Dictionary definitions for canon (2 of 3)

canon2
/ (ˈkænən) /

noun
one of several priests on the permanent staff of a cathedral, who are responsible for organizing services, maintaining the fabric, etc
Also called: canon regular RC Church a member of either of two religious orders, the Augustinian or Premonstratensian Canons, living communally as monks but performing clerical duties

Word Origin for canon

C13: from Anglo-French canunie, from Late Latin canonicus one living under a rule, from canon 1

British Dictionary definitions for canon (3 of 3)

cañon
/ (ˈkænjən) /

noun
a variant spelling of canyon
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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