celebrate

[ sel-uh-breyt ]
/ ˈsɛl əˌbreɪt /

verb (used with object), cel·e·brat·ed, cel·e·brat·ing.

to observe (a day) or commemorate (an event) with ceremonies or festivities: to celebrate Christmas; to celebrate the success of a new play.
to make known publicly; proclaim: The newspaper celebrated the end of the war in red headlines.
to praise widely or to present to widespread and favorable public notice, as through newspapers or novels: a novel celebrating the joys of marriage; the countryside celebrated in the novels of Hardy.
to perform with appropriate rites and ceremonies; solemnize: to celebrate a marriage.

verb (used without object), cel·e·brat·ed, cel·e·brat·ing.

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Question 1 of 9
“I do believe that the buck stops here, that I cannot rely upon public opinion polls to tell me what is right. I do believe that right makes might and that if I am wrong, 10 angels swearing I was right would make no difference.”

Origin of celebrate

First recorded in 1425–75; late Middle English, from Latin celebrātus, past participle of celebrāre “to solemnize, celebrate, honor,” equivalent to celebr- (stem of celeber ) “often repeated, famous” + -ātus past participle suffix; see -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM celebrate

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH celebrate

celebrate , celibate, cerebrate
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for celebrate

British Dictionary definitions for celebrate

celebrate
/ (ˈsɛlɪˌbreɪt) /

verb

to rejoice in or have special festivities to mark (a happy day, event, etc)
(tr) to observe (a birthday, anniversary, etc)she celebrates her ninetieth birthday next month
(tr) to perform (a solemn or religious ceremony), esp to officiate at (Mass)
(tr) to praise publicly; proclaim

Derived forms of celebrate

celebration, nouncelebrative, adjectivecelebrator, nouncelebratory, adjective

Word Origin for celebrate

C15: from Latin celebrāre, from celeber numerous, thronged, renowned
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012