cell

1
[ sel ]
/ sɛl /

noun

verb (used without object)

to live in a cell: The two prisoners had celled together for three years.

Origin of cell

1
before 1150; 1665–75 for def 4; Middle English celle < Old French celle < Medieval Latin cella monastic cell, Latin: room (see cella); Old English cell < Medieval Latin, as above; see cella

OTHER WORDS FROM cell

cell-like, adjective

Definition for cells (2 of 4)

cell2
[ sel ]
/ sɛl /

noun

Definition for cells (3 of 4)

cel

or cell

[ sel ]
/ sɛl /

noun

a transparent celluloid sheet on which a character, scene, etc., is drawn or painted and which constitutes one frame in the filming of an animated cartoon: may be overlapped for change of background or foreground.

Origin of cel

by shortening of celluloid

Definition for cells (4 of 4)

cell phone

or cell·phone

[ sel-fohn ]
/ ˈsɛlˌfoʊn /

noun

a wireless telephone using a system of low-powered radio transmitters, with each transmitter covering a distinct geographical area (cell), and computer equipment to switch a call from one area to another, thus enabling broad-scale portable phone service.
such a wireless telephone that has other functions, as text messaging or Internet access.
Also called cel·lu·lar phone, cel·lu·lar tel·e·phone.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for cells

British Dictionary definitions for cells (1 of 3)

cell1
/ (sɛl) /

noun

Derived forms of cell

cell-like, adjective

Word Origin for cell

C12: from Medieval Latin cella monk's cell, from Latin: room, storeroom; related to Latin cēlāre to hide

British Dictionary definitions for cells (2 of 3)

cell2
/ (sɛl) /

noun

a variant spelling of cel

British Dictionary definitions for cells (3 of 3)

cel

cell

/ (sɛl) /

noun

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for cells

cell
[ sĕl ]

n.

The smallest structural unit of an organism that is capable of independent functioning, consisting of one or more nuclei, cytoplasm, and various organelles, all surrounded by a semipermeable cell membrane.
A small enclosed cavity or space.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for cells

cell
[ sĕl ]

The basic unit of living matter in all organisms, consisting of protoplasm enclosed within a cell membrane. All cells except bacterial cells have a distinct nucleus that contains the cell's DNA as well as other structures (called organelles) that include mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuoles. The main source of energy for all of a cell's biological processes is ATP. See more at eukaryote prokaryote.
Any of various devices, or units within such devices, that are capable of converting some form of energy into electricity. Cells contain two electrodes and an electrolyte. See more at electrolytic cell solar cell voltaic cell.

Other words from cell

cellular adjective
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Culture definitions for cells (1 of 3)

cell

A region of the atmosphere in which air tends to circulate without flowing outward.

Culture definitions for cells (2 of 3)

cell

The basic unit of all living things except viruses. In advanced organisms, cells consist of a nucleus (which contains genetic material), cytoplasm, and organelles, all of which are surrounded by a cell membrane.

notes for cell

Groups of cells with similar structure and function form tissues.

Culture definitions for cells (3 of 3)

cell phone

A portable telephone that uses wireless cellular technology to send and receive phone signals. This technology works by dividing the Earth into small regions called cells. Within each cell the wireless telephone signal goes over its assigned bandwidth to a cell tower, which relays the signal to a telephone switching network, connecting the user to the desired party.

notes for cell phone

The proximity to a cell tower is often the key to good reception when using a cell phone.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.