Idioms

    call to the colors, to summon for service in the armed forces: Thousands are being called to the colors.
    change color,
    1. to blush as from embarrassment.
    2. to turn pale, as from fear: When he saw the size of his opponent, he changed color.
    with flying colors. flying colors.
Also especially British, col·our.

Origin of color

1250–1300; Middle English col(o)ur < Anglo-French (French couleur) < Latin colōr- (stem of color) hue
Related formscol·or·er, nouno·ver·col·or, verbpre·col·or, noun, verbre·col·or, verb (used with object)trans·col·or, adjectiveun·der·col·or, noun
Can be confusedcolor hue shade tint (see synonym study at shade)

Synonyms for color

23. bias, twist.

Usage note

See -or1.

Usage note

See black.

color.

(in prescriptions) let it be colored.

Origin of color.

From the Latin word colōrētur
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for color

Contemporary Examples of color

Historical Examples of color

  • She quietly yielded, but her color came and went, and her lips moved as if to speak.

    Malbone

    Thomas Wentworth Higginson

  • He went on until the sun was low in the west and all the sky was rimmed with color.

  • A ghost of color was going up her throat, staining her cheeks.

  • "I wish I could agree with you," laughed Grace, her color rising.

  • No color, only light came to the surface of it, and broke in the loveliest smile.

    Weighed and Wanting

    George MacDonald


British Dictionary definitions for color

color

noun, verb

the US spelling of colour
Derived Formscolorable, adjectivecolorer, nouncolorful, adjectivecoloring, nouncolorist, nouncolorless, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for color
n.

early 13c., "skin color, complexion," from Old French color "color, complexion, appearance" (Modern French couleur), from Latin color "color of the skin; color in general, hue; appearance," from Old Latin colos, originally "a covering" (akin to celare "to hide, conceal"), from PIE root *kel- "to cover, conceal" (see cell).

For sense evolution, cf. Sanskrit varnah "covering, color," related to vrnoti "covers," and also see chroma. Meaning "visible color, color of something" is attested in English from c.1300. As "color as a property of things," from late 14c. Old English words for "color" were hiw ("hue"), bleo.

v.

late 14c.; see color (n.); earliest use is figurative. Related: Colored; coloring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

color in Medicine

color

[kŭlər]

n.

That aspect of the appearance of objects and light sources that may be specified in terms of hue, lightness, and saturation.
That portion of the visible electromagnetic spectrum specified in terms of wavelength, luminosity, and purity.
The general appearance of the skin.
The skin pigmentation of a person not classified as white.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

color in Science

color

[kŭlər]

The sensation produced by the effect of light waves striking the retina of the eye. The color of something depends mainly on which wavelengths of light it emits, reflects, or transmits.
Color charge. See also hadron.
A Closer Look: When beams of colored light are mixed, or added, their wavelengths combine to form other colors. All spectral colors can be formed by mixing wavelengths corresponding to the additive primaries red, green, and blue. When two of the additive primaries are mixed in equal proportion, they form the complement of the third. Thus cyan (a mixture of green and blue) is the complement of red; magenta (a mixture of blue and red) is the complement of green; and yellow (a mixture of red and green) is the complement of blue. Mixing the three additive primaries in equal proportions reconstitutes white light. When light passes through a color filter, certain wavelengths are absorbed, or subtracted, while others are transmitted. The subtractive primaries cyan, magenta, and yellow can be combined using overlapping filters to form all other colors. When two of the subtractive primaries are combined in equal proportion, they form the additive primary whose wavelength they share. Thus overlapping filters of cyan (blue and green) and magenta (blue and red) filter out all wavelengths except blue; magenta (blue and red) and yellow (red and green) transmit only red; and yellow (red and green) and cyan (blue and green) transmit only green. Combining all three subtractive primaries in equal proportions filters out all wavelengths, producing black. Light striking a colored surface behaves similarly to light passing through a filter, with certain wavelengths being absorbed and others reflected. Pigments are combined to form different colors by a process of subtractive absorption of various wavelengths.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with color

color

In addition to the idiom beginning with color

  • color of someone's money, see the

also see:

  • false colors
  • horse of a different color
  • lend color to
  • look through rose-colored glasses
  • under false colors
  • with flying colors
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.