conceit

[ kuhn-seet ]
/ kənˈsit /

noun

verb (used with object)

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Idioms for conceit

    out of conceit with, displeased or dissatisfied with.

Origin of conceit

1350–1400; Middle English conceyte, conceipt, derivative of conceive by analogy with deceive, deceit and receive, receipt; compare Anglo-French conceite; see concept
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for conceit

British Dictionary definitions for conceit

conceit
/ (kənˈsiːt) /

noun

a high, often exaggerated, opinion of oneself or one's accomplishments; vanity
literary an elaborate image or far-fetched comparison, esp as used by the English Metaphysical poets
archaic
  1. a witty expression
  2. fancy; imagination
  3. an idea
obsolete a small ornament

verb (tr)

Northern English dialect to like or be able to bear (something, such as food or drink)
obsolete to think or imagine

Word Origin for conceit

C14: from conceive
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012