conquer

[kong-ker]

verb (used with object)

to acquire by force of arms; win in war: to conquer a foreign land.
to overcome by force; subdue: to conquer an enemy.
to gain, win, or obtain by effort, personal appeal, etc.: conquer the hearts of his audience.
to gain a victory over; surmount; master; overcome: to conquer disease and poverty; to conquer one's fear.

verb (used without object)

to be victorious; make conquests; gain the victory: Despite their differences, their love will conquer.

Origin of conquer

1200–50; Middle English conqueren < Anglo-French conquerir, Old French conquerre < Vulgar Latin *conquērere to acquire (for Latin conquīrere to seek out). See con-, query
Related formscon·quer·a·ble, adjectivecon·quer·a·ble·ness, nouncon·quer·ing·ly, adverbhalf-con·quered, adjectivepre·con·quer, verb (used with object)re·con·quer, verb (used with object)un·con·quer·a·ble, adjectiveun·con·quer·a·bly, adverbun·con·quered, adjective

Synonyms for conquer

Synonym study

2. See defeat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for conquer

Contemporary Examples of conquer

Historical Examples of conquer

  • And even if the Germans did conquer Russia, what did it matter?

  • For all around the North Sea and on its bosom have risen races of men to conquer the universe again and again.

    Roden's Corner

    Henry Seton Merriman

  • In any event she meant to conquer Powers, and was not without reason, or precedent, in trying to see if blarney would aid threats.

  • Culture cannot be spread by force, since force does not conquer spirit.

  • And then, after years of horror and humiliation, they gained a little and began to conquer because they did not mind defeat.

    Alarms and Discursions

    G. K. Chesterton



British Dictionary definitions for conquer

conquer

verb

to overcome (an enemy, army, etc); defeat
to overcome (an obstacle, feeling, desire, etc); surmount
(tr) to gain possession or control of by or as if by force or war; win
(tr) to gain the love, sympathy, etc, of (someone) by seduction or force of personality
Derived Formsconquerable, adjectiveconquerableness, nounconquering, adjectiveconqueror, noun

Word Origin for conquer

C13: from Old French conquerre, from Vulgar Latin conquērere (unattested) to obtain, from Latin conquīrere to search for, collect, from quaerere to seek
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for conquer
v.

c.1200, cunquearen, from Old French conquerre "conquer, defeat, vanquish," from Vulgar Latin *conquaerere (for Latin conquirere) "to search for, procure by effort, win," from Latin com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + quaerere "to seek, gain" (see query (v.)). Related: Conquered; conquering.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with conquer

conquer

see divide and conquer.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.