depression

[ dih-presh-uhn ]
/ dɪˈprɛʃ ən /

noun

Origin of depression

1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin dēpressiōn- (stem of dēpressiō), Late Latin: a pressing down, equivalent to Latin dēpress(us) (see depress) + -iōn- -ion

OTHER WORDS FROM depression

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for depression

British Dictionary definitions for depression (1 of 2)

depression
/ (dɪˈprɛʃən) /

noun

British Dictionary definitions for depression (2 of 2)

Depression
/ (dɪˈprɛʃən) /

noun

the Depression the worldwide economic depression of the early 1930s, when there was mass unemploymentAlso known as: the Great Depression, the Slump
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for depression

depression
[ dĭ-prĕshən ]

n.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for depression

depression
[ dĭ-prĕshən ]

A geographic area, such as a sinkhole or basin, that is lower than its surroundings.
A mood disorder characterized by an inability to experience pleasure, difficulty in concentrating, disturbance of sleep and appetite, and feelings of sadness, guilt, and helplessness.
A reduction in the activity of a physiological process, such as respiration.
A region of low atmospheric pressure. Low pressure systems result in precipitation, ranging from mild to severe in intensity. See also cyclone.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Culture definitions for depression

depression

A period of drastic decline in the national economy, characterized by decreasing business activity, falling prices, and unemployment. The best known of such periods is the Great Depression, which occurred in the 1930s.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.