disposition

[ dis-puh-zish-uhn ]
/ ˌdɪs pəˈzɪʃ ən /

noun

Origin of disposition

1325–75; Middle English disposicioun (< Anglo-French) < Latin dispositiōn- (stem of dispositiō), equivalent to disposit(us) (past participle of dispōnere to distribute; dispos- (see dispose) + -itus past participle suffix) + -iōn- -ion

Related forms

dis·po·si·tion·al, adjectivere·dis·po·si·tion, noun

Synonym study

1. Disposition, temper, temperament refer to the aspects and habits of mind and emotion that one displays over a length of time. Disposition is the natural or prevailing aspect of one's mind as shown in behavior and in relationships with others: a happy disposition; a selfish disposition. Temper sometimes denotes the essential quality of one's nature: a glacial temper; usually it has to do with propensity toward anger: an even temper; a quick or hot temper. Temperament refers to the particular balance of emotions determining a person's character: an artistic temperament.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for disposition

British Dictionary definitions for disposition

disposition

/ (ˌdɪspəˈzɪʃən) /

noun

a person's usual temperament or frame of mind
a natural or acquired tendency, inclination, or habit in a person or thing
philosophy logic a property that consists not in the present state of an object, but in its propensity to change in a certain way under certain conditions, as brittleness which consists in the propensity to break when struckCompare occurrent
archaic manner of placing or arranging

Derived Forms

dispositional, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012