disposition

[ dis-puh-zish-uhn ]
/ ˌdɪs pəˈzɪʃ ən /

noun

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Origin of disposition

1325–75; Middle English disposicioun (< Anglo-French) < Latin dispositiōn- (stem of dispositiō), equivalent to disposit(us) (past participle of dispōnere to distribute; dispos- (see dispose) + -itus past participle suffix) + -iōn- -ion

synonym study for disposition

1. Disposition, temper, temperament refer to the aspects and habits of mind and emotion that one displays over a length of time. Disposition is the natural or prevailing aspect of one's mind as shown in behavior and in relationships with others: a happy disposition; a selfish disposition. Temper sometimes denotes the essential quality of one's nature: a glacial temper; usually it has to do with propensity toward anger: an even temper; a quick or hot temper. Temperament refers to the particular balance of emotions determining a person's character: an artistic temperament.

OTHER WORDS FROM disposition

dis·po·si·tion·al, adjectivere·dis·po·si·tion, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for disposition

British Dictionary definitions for disposition

disposition
/ (ˌdɪspəˈzɪʃən) /

noun

a person's usual temperament or frame of mind
a natural or acquired tendency, inclination, or habit in a person or thing
philosophy logic a property that consists not in the present state of an object, but in its propensity to change in a certain way under certain conditions, as brittleness which consists in the propensity to break when struckCompare occurrent
archaic manner of placing or arranging

Derived forms of disposition

dispositional, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012