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dory

1
[ dawr-ee, dohr-ee ]
/ ˈdɔr i, ˈdoʊr i /
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Definition of dory

noun, plural do·ries.
a boat with a narrow, flat bottom, high bow, and flaring sides.
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Origin of dory

1
First recorded in 1700–10, Americanism; alleged to be from Miskito dóri, dúri (if this word is itself not from English )

Other definitions for dory (2 of 2)

dory2
[ dawr-ee, dohr-ee ]
/ ˈdɔr i, ˈdoʊr i /

noun, plural do·ries.

Origin of dory

2
1400–50; late Middle English dorre, dorray<Middle French doree (feminine past participle of dorer to gild) <Late Latin deaurāta;see dorado
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use dory in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for dory (1 of 2)

dory1
/ (ˈdɔːrɪ) /

noun plural -ries
any spiny-finned marine teleost food fish of the family Zeidae, esp the John Dory, having a deep compressed body

Word Origin for dory

C14: from French dorée gilded, from dorer to gild, from Late Latin deaurāre, ultimately from Latin aurum gold

British Dictionary definitions for dory (2 of 2)

dory2
/ (ˈdɔːrɪ) /

noun plural -ries
US and Canadian a flat-bottomed rowing boat with a high bow, stern, and sides

Word Origin for dory

C18: from Mosquito (an American Indian language of Honduras and Nicaragua) dóri dugout
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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