driver

[drahy-ver]

noun


Origin of driver

First recorded in 1350–1400, driver is from the Middle English word drivere. See drive, -er1
Related formsdriv·er·less, adjectivenon·driv·er, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for driver

Contemporary Examples of driver

Historical Examples of driver

  • The driver faced the bill toward the nearest street-light and scanned it.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • He was a little ahead of them; but it was not probable that the driver would stop for him.

  • Between one and two in the morning our driver descended from his attic.

    The Roof of France

    Matilda Betham-Edwards

  • We could not miss the way, our driver said, and woe betide us if we did!

    The Roof of France

    Matilda Betham-Edwards

  • Presently the driver stopped, for it was time for the horses to rest, and also dinner-time.

    Rico and Wiseli

    Johanna Spyri


British Dictionary definitions for driver

driver

noun

a person who drives a vehicle
in the driver's seat in a position of control
a person who drives animals
a mechanical component that exerts a force on another to produce motion
golf a club, a No. 1 wood, with a large head and deep face for tee shots
electronics a circuit whose output provides the input of another circuit
computing a computer program that controls a device
something that creates and fuels activity, or gives force or impetus
Derived Formsdriverless, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for driver
n.

"one who drives" in various senses, c.1400; agent noun from drive (v.). Slavery sense is attested by 1796. Driver's seat is attested by 1867; figurative use by 1954.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with driver

driver

see backseat driver; in the driver's seat.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.