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Elysium

[ih-lizh-ee-uh m, ih-lee-zhee-, ih-liz-, ih-lee-zee-, ih-lizh-uh m]
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noun
  1. Also called Elysian Fields. Classical Mythology. the abode of the blessed after death.
  2. any similarly conceived abode or state of the dead.
  3. any place or state of perfect happiness; paradise.
  4. an area in the northern hemisphere of Mars, appearing as a light region when viewed telescopically from the earth.
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Origin of Elysium

1590–1600; < Latin < Greek Ēlýsion (pedíon) the Elysian (plain)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for elysium

Historical Examples

  • In this elysium it was no wonder that his spirits were elevated, and that he worked with a will.

    Charles Lever, His Life in His Letters, Vol. I (of II)

    Edmund Downey

  • In anticipation it was a thing boundless and endless, a foretaste of Elysium.

    The Life of Mansie Wauch

    David Macbeth Moir

  • With Mrs. Arnold for leader they expected a three days' elysium.

  • I go to Liberia, not as an Elysium of romance, but as to a field of work.

    Uncle Tom's Cabin

    Harriet Beecher Stowe

  • And where, then, is the Elysium which you must never possess?

    The Bravo of Venice

    Heinrich Zschokke


British Dictionary definitions for elysium

Elysium

noun
  1. Also called: Elysian fields Greek myth the dwelling place of the blessed after deathSee also Islands of the Blessed
  2. a state or place of perfect bliss
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Word Origin

C16: from Latin, from Greek Ēlusion pedion Elysian (that is, blessed) fields
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for elysium

Elysium

n.

1590s, from Latin Elysium, from Greek Elysion (pedion) "abode of the blessed" (see Elysian).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper