euphoria

[yoo-fawr-ee-uh, -fohr-]

noun

a state of intense happiness and self-confidence: She was flooded with euphoria as she went to the podium to receive her Student Research Award.
Psychology. a feeling of happiness, confidence, or well-being sometimes exaggerated in pathological states as mania.

Origin of euphoria

1880–85; < New Latin < Greek euphoría state of well-being. See eu-, -phore, -ia
Related formseu·phor·ic [yoo-fawr-ik, -for-] /yuˈfɔr ɪk, -ˈfɒr-/, adjectiveeu·phor·i·cal·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for euphoria

Contemporary Examples of euphoria

Historical Examples of euphoria

  • When he had awakened, it had been with the euphoria all gone and with his present hangover.

    The Stars, My Brothers

    Edmond Hamilton

  • It was against the law for dozy-pills to produce a sensation of euphoria, of well-being.

    Operation: Outer Space

    William Fitzgerald Jenkins

  • It seems to be one form of the random activity that goes with euphoria.

    Psychology

    Robert S. Woodworth

  • There is no metaphysical hair-splitting in An Enemy of the People, nor sentimental talk about euphoria and going happily to death.

  • By some of the earlier botanical works the litchi is placed either in the genus Dimocarpus or Euphoria.

    The Nut Culturist

    Andrew S. Fuller



British Dictionary definitions for euphoria

euphoria

noun

a feeling of great elation, esp when exaggerated
Derived Formseuphoric (juːˈfɒrɪk), adjective

Word Origin for euphoria

C19: from Greek: good ability to endure, from eu- + pherein to bear
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for euphoria
n.

1727, a physician's term for "condition of feeling healthy and comfortable (especially when sick)," medical Latin, from Greek euphoria "power of enduring easily," from euphoros, literally "bearing well," from eu "well" (see eu-) + pherein "to carry" (see infer). Non-technical use, now the main one, dates to 1882 and is perhaps a reintroduction.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for euphoria

euphoria

[yōō-fôrē-ə]

n.

A feeling of great happiness or well-being, commonly exaggerated and not necessarily well founded.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.