embrace

1
[ em-breys ]
/ ɛmˈbreɪs /

verb (used with object), em·braced, em·brac·ing.

verb (used without object), em·braced, em·brac·ing.

to join in an embrace.

noun

an act or instance of embracing.

Origin of embrace

1
1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French embracier, equivalent to em- em-1 + bracier to embrace, derivative of brace the two arms; see brace

Related forms

em·brace·a·ble, adjectiveem·brace·ment, nounem·brac·er, nounun·em·brace·a·ble, adjective

Definition for embrace (2 of 2)

embrace

2
[ em-breys ]
/ ɛmˈbreɪs /

verb (used with object), em·braced, em·brac·ing. Law.

to attempt to influence (a judge or jury) through corrupt means.

Origin of embrace

2
1400–1450; late Middle English: to influence, prejudice, bribe (a jury), perhaps the same word as embrace1, influenced by embrasen to set on fire (< Middle French embraser; see em-1, braise)

Related forms

em·brac·er, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for embrace

British Dictionary definitions for embrace (1 of 2)

embrace

1
/ (ɪmˈbreɪs) /

verb (mainly tr)

noun

the act of embracing
(often plural) euphemistic sexual intercourse

Derived Forms

embraceable, adjectiveembracement, nounembracer, noun

Word Origin for embrace

C14: from Old French embracier, from em- + brace a pair of arms, from Latin bracchia arms

British Dictionary definitions for embrace (2 of 2)

embrace

2
/ (ɪmˈbreɪs) /

verb

(tr) criminal law to commit or attempt to commit embracery against (a jury, etc)

Word Origin for embrace

C15: back formation from embraceor
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012