intercalate

[ in-tur-kuh-leyt ]
/ ɪnˈtɜr kəˌleɪt /

verb (used with object), in·ter·ca·lat·ed, in·ter·ca·lat·ing.

to interpolate; interpose.
to insert (an extra day, month, etc.) in the calendar.

Origin of intercalate

1605–15; < Latin intercalātus past participle of intercalāre to insert a day or month into the calendar, equivalent to inter- inter- + calā- (stem of calāre to proclaim) + -tus past participle suffix
Related formsin·ter·ca·la·tive, adjectiveun·in·ter·ca·lat·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for intercalate

British Dictionary definitions for intercalate

intercalate

/ (ɪnˈtɜːkəˌleɪt) /

verb (tr)

to insert (one or more days) into the calendar
to interpolate or insert
Derived Formsintercalation, nounintercalative, adjective

Word Origin for intercalate

C17: from Latin intercalāre to insert, proclaim that a day has been inserted, from inter- + calāre to proclaim
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for intercalate

intercalate


v.

"to insert a day into the calendar," 1610s, from Latin intercalatus, past participle of intercalare "to proclaim the insertion of an intercalary day," from inter- "between" (see inter-) + calare (see calendar). Related: Intercalated; intercalating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper