Dictionary.com

last

1
[ last, lahst ]
/ læst, lɑst /
Save This Word!
See synonyms for: last / lasted / lastest / lasting on Thesaurus.com

adjective, a superlative of late, with later as comparative.
adverb
noun
QUIZ
ARE YOU A TRUE BLUE CHAMPION OF THESE "BLUE" SYNONYMS?
We could talk until we're blue in the face about this quiz on words for the color "blue," but we think you should take the quiz and find out if you're a whiz at these colorful terms.
Question 1 of 8
Which of the following words describes “sky blue”?
Meet Grammar CoachWrite or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing
Meet Grammar CoachImprove Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Idioms about last

Origin of last

1
First recorded before 900; Middle English last, latst, syncopated variant of latest, Old English latest, lætest, superlative of læt; see origin at late

synonym study for last

1. Last, final, ultimate refer to what comes as an ending. That which is last comes or stands after all others in a stated series or succession; last may refer to objects or activities: a seat in the last row; the last game. That which is final comes at the end, or serves to end or terminate, admitting of nothing further; final is rarely used of objects: to make a final attempt. That which is ultimate (literally, most remote) is the last that can be reached, as in progression or regression, experience, or a course of investigation: ultimate truths.

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH last

last , penultimate, ultimate

Other definitions for last (2 of 4)

last2
[ last, lahst ]
/ læst, lɑst /

verb (used without object)
to go on or continue in time: The festival lasted three weeks.
to continue unexpended or unexhausted; be enough: We'll enjoy ourselves while our money lasts.
to continue in force, vigor, effectiveness, etc.: to last for the whole course.
to continue or remain in usable condition for a reasonable period of time: They were handsome shoes but they didn't last.
verb (used with object)
to continue to survive for the duration of (often followed by out): They lasted the war in Switzerland.

Origin of last

2
First recorded before 900; Middle English lasten, Old English lǣstan “to follow (literally, go in the tracks of), perform, continue, last”; cognate with German laisten “to follow,” Gothic laistjan. See last3

synonym study for last

1. See continue.

Other definitions for last (3 of 4)

last3
[ last, lahst ]
/ læst, lɑst /

noun
a wooden or metal form in the shape of the human foot on which boots or shoes are shaped or repaired.
the shape or form of a shoe.
verb (used with object)
to shape on or fit to a last.

Origin of last

3
First recorded before 900; Middle English lest(e), last(e), Old English lǣste; cognate with German Leisten; akin to Old English lāst, Gothic laists “track”

OTHER WORDS FROM last

laster, noun

Other definitions for last (4 of 4)

last4
[ last, lahst ]
/ læst, lɑst /

noun
any of various large units of weight or capacity, varying in amount in different localities and for different commodities, often equivalent to 4,000 pounds (1,814.37 kilograms).

Origin of last

4
First recorded before 900; Middle English; Old English hlæst; cognate with Dutch last, German Last “load”; akin to lade
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

MORE ABOUT LAST

What is a basic definition of last?

Last describes something as being the final in a series or being the most recent occurrence of something. Last also means to take place over a certain length of time. Last has many other senses.

If something is last, it is the finalizer or terminating point. Nothing else will follow after something that is last. Last can apply to anything that involves a series, amount, or order. This sense of last is a superlative of late.

  • Real-life examples: When you take the last scoop of ice cream from a container, there will be no more ice cream in the container. The last stop on a bus route is the final one the driver will make before returning to the station or repeating a loop. If you are down to your last dollar, you only have one dollar remaining.
  • Used in a sentence: Jonah was behind all the other runners and finished the race last.

Last can also describe something as being the most recent thing that happened or was closest to the current moment. For example, the last person you talked to is the person you spoke to most recently. You’ve spoken to no one else since then. This sense of last is a synonym of the word latest.

  • Real-life examples: The night that just happened was last night. The week before this current one was last week. The last thing you ate was the most recent food you ate.
  • Used in a sentence: Last year I struggled in math, but this year I understand it much better.

As a verb, last can mean to continue for an amount of time. For example, if a festival lasts for a week, then it goes on for a week before ending.

  • Real-life examples: Many television shows last 30 minutes (including the commercials). A party might last all night. A very boring lecture may seem to last forever.
  • Used in a sentence: The carnival came to town and lasted all weekend.

In a similar sense, last can mean to exist or be in supply for a certain length of time.

  • Used in a sentence: They only have enough water to last for two days.

Where does last come from?

The first records of last come from before the 900s. The adjective form is a variation of the Old English lætest (latest). The verb form comes from the Old English lǣstan, meaning “to follow” or “to go in the tracks of.”

Did you know ... ?

What are some other forms related to last?

  • lastly (adverb)
  • laster (noun)

What are some synonyms for last?

What are some words that share a root or word element with last

What are some words that often get used in discussing last?

How is last used in real life?

Last is a very common word with many different senses. It most often describes something as being the final of something or as being the most recent.

Try using last!

True or False?

The letter Z is the last letter in the English alphabet.

How to use last in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for last (1 of 4)

last1
/ (lɑːst) /

adjective (often prenominal)
adverb
noun

Word Origin for last

variant of Old English latest, lætest, superlative of late

usage for last

Since last can mean either after all others or most recent, it is better to avoid using this word where ambiguity might arise as in her last novel. Final or latest should be used in such contexts to avoid ambiguity

British Dictionary definitions for last (2 of 4)

last2
/ (lɑːst) /

verb
(when intr, often foll by for) to remain in being (for a length of time); continuehis hatred lasted for several years
to be sufficient for the needs of (a person) for (a length of time)it will last us until Friday
(when intr, often foll by for) to remain fresh, uninjured, or unaltered (for a certain time or duration)he lasted for three hours underground
See also last out

Derived forms of last

laster, noun

Word Origin for last

Old English lǣstan; related to Gothic laistjan to follow

British Dictionary definitions for last (3 of 4)

last3
/ (lɑːst) /

noun
the wooden or metal form on which a shoe or boot is fashioned or repaired
verb
(tr) to fit (a shoe or boot) on a last

Derived forms of last

laster, noun

Word Origin for last

Old English lǣste, from lāst footprint; related to Old Norse leistr foot, Gothic laists

British Dictionary definitions for last (4 of 4)

last4
/ (lɑːst) /

noun
a unit of weight or capacity having various values in different places and for different commodities. Commonly used values are 2 tons, 2000 pounds, 80 bushels, or 640 gallons

Word Origin for last

Old English hlæst load; related to hladan to lade 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with last

last

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
FEEDBACK