laurel

[ lawr-uhl, lor- ]
/ ˈlɔr əl, ˈlɒr- /
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noun

verb (used with object), lau·reled, lau·rel·ing or (especially British) lau·relled, lau·rel·ling.

to adorn or wreathe with laurel.
to honor with marks of distinction.

Nearby words

  1. lauraldehyde,
  2. laurasia,
  3. laurate,
  4. laureate,
  5. laureen,
  6. laurel and hardy,
  7. laurel cherry,
  8. laurel family,
  9. laurel oak,
  10. lauren

Idioms

    look to one's laurels, to be alert to the possibility of being excelled or surpassed: New developments in the industry are forcing long-established firms to look to their laurels.
    rest on one's laurels, to be content with one's past or present honors, achievements, etc.: He retired at the peak of his career and is resting on his laurels.

Origin of laurel

1250–1300; dissimilated variant of Middle English laurer, earlier lorer < Anglo-French; Old French lorier bay tree, equivalent to lor bay, laurel (< Latin laurus) + -ier -ier2; see -er2

Related formsun·lau·reled, adjectiveun·lau·relled, adjective

Laurel

[ lawr-uh l, lor- ]
/ ˈlɔr əl, ˈlɒr- /

noun

StanArthur Stanley Jefferson, 1890–1965, U.S. motion-picture actor and comedian, born in England.
a city in SE Mississippi.
a town in central Maryland.
a female given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for laurel


British Dictionary definitions for laurel

laurel

/ (ˈlɒrəl) /

noun

verb -rels, -relling or -relled or US -rels, -reling or -reled

(tr) to crown with laurels

Word Origin for laurel

C13 lorer, from Old French lorier laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for laurel

laurel

n.

c.1300, lorrer, from Old French laurier (12c.), from Latin laurus "laurel tree," probably related to Greek daphne "laurel" (for change of d- to l- see lachrymose), probably from a pre-IE Mediterranean language. The change of second -r- to -l- after mid-14c. is by dissimilation. An emblem of victory or of distinction, hence the phrase to rest (originally repose) on one's laurels, first attested 1831.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with laurel

laurel

see look to one's laurels; rest on one's laurels.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.