law

1
[ law ]
/ lɔ /

noun

verb (used with object)

Chiefly Dialect. to sue or prosecute.
British. (formerly) to expeditate (an animal).

Idioms

Origin of law

1
before 1000; Middle English law(e), lagh(e), Old English lagu < Old Norse *lagu, early plural of lag layer, stratum, a laying in order, fixed tune, (in collective sense) law; akin to lay1, lie2
Related formslaw·like, adjective
Can be confusedlaw hypothesis theory (see synonym study at theory)

Definition for law (2 of 6)

law

2
[ law ]
/ lɔ /

adjective, adverb, noun Obsolete.

Definition for law (3 of 6)

law

3
[ law ]
/ lɔ /

verb (used with or without object), noun Obsolete.

Definition for law (4 of 6)

law

4
[ law ]
/ lɔ /

interjection Older Use.

(used as an exclamation expressing astonishment.)

Origin of law

4
First recorded in 1580–90; form of lord

Definition for law (5 of 6)

Law

[ law ]
/ lɔ /

noun

Andrew Bon·ar [bon-er] /ˈbɒn ər/, 1858–1923, English statesman, born in Canada: prime minister 1922–23.
John,1671–1729, Scottish financier.
William,1686–1761, English clergyman and devotional writer.

Definition for law (6 of 6)

legal dictionary


noun

a specialized dictionary covering terms used in the various branches of the legal profession, as civil law, criminal law, and corporate law. A comprehensive legal dictionary adds to its body of standard English entries many words and phrases that have made their way into modern legal practice from law French and Latin and are rarely found in a general English monolingual dictionary. Such a specialized dictionary is useful not only for law students and for attorneys themselves, but for members of the lay public who require legal services. Legal dictionaries published in print follow the normal practice of sorting entry terms alphabetically, while electronic dictionaries, such as the online Dictionary of Law on Dictionary.com, allow direct, immediate access to a search term.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for law

British Dictionary definitions for law (1 of 4)

law

1
/ (lɔː) /

noun

Related formsRelated adjectives: judicial, jural, juridical, legal

Word Origin for law

Old English lagu, from Scandinavian; compare Icelandic lög (pl) things laid down, law

British Dictionary definitions for law (2 of 4)

law

2
/ (lɔː) /

noun

Scot a hill, esp one rounded in shape

Word Origin for law

Old English hlǣw

British Dictionary definitions for law (3 of 4)

law

3
/ (lɔː) /

adjective

a Scot word for low 1

British Dictionary definitions for law (4 of 4)

Law

/ (lɔː) /

noun

Andrew Bonar (ˈbɒnə). 1858–1923, British Conservative statesman, born in Canada; prime minister (1922–23)
Denis. born 1940, Scottish footballer; a striker, he played for Manchester United (1962–73) and Scotland (30 goals in 55 games, 1958–74); European Footballer of the Year (1964)
John. 1671–1729, Scottish financier. He founded the first bank in France (1716) and the Mississippi Scheme for the development of Louisiana (1717), which collapsed due to excessive speculation
Jude . born 1972, British film actor, who starred in The Talented Mr Ripley (1999), Cold Mountain (2003), and Sherlock Holmes (2009)
William. 1686–1761, British Anglican divine, best known for A Serious Call to a Holy and Devout Life (1728)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for law

law


n.

Old English lagu (plural laga, comb. form lah-) "law, ordinance, rule, regulation; district governed by the same laws," from Old Norse *lagu "law," collective plural of lag "layer, measure, stroke," literally "something laid down or fixed," from Proto-Germanic *lagan "put, lay" (see lay (v.)).

Replaced Old English æ and gesetnes, which had the same sense development as law. Cf. also statute, from Latin statuere; German Gesetz "law," from Old High German gisatzida; Lithuanian istatymas, from istatyti "set up, establish." In physics, from 1660s. Law and order have been coupled since 1796.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for law

law

[ lô ]

n.

A rule of conduct or procedure established by custom, agreement, or authority.
A set of rules or principles for a specific area of a legal system.
A piece of enacted legislation.
A formulation describing a relationship observed to be invariable between or among phenomena for all cases in which the specified conditions are met.
A generalization based on consistent experience or results.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for law

law

[ lô ]

A statement that describes invariable relationships among phenomena under a specified set of conditions. Boyle's law, for instance, describes what will happen to the volume of an ideal gas if its pressure changes and its temperature remains the same. The conditions under which some physical laws hold are idealized (for example, there are no ideal gases in the real world), thus some physical laws apply universally but only approximately. See Note at hypothesis.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with law

law


In addition to the idioms beginning with law

  • law and order
  • law of averages
  • law of the jungle
  • law unto oneself

also see:

  • above suspicion (the law)
  • lay down the law
  • letter of the law
  • long arm of the law
  • Murphy's law
  • possession is nine points of the law
  • take the law into one's hands
  • unwritten law
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.