mature

[ muh-toor, -tyoor, -choor, -chur ]
/ məˈtʊər, -ˈtyʊər, -ˈtʃʊər, -ˈtʃɜr /

adjective, ma·tur·er, ma·tur·est.

verb (used with object), ma·tured, ma·tur·ing.

verb (used without object), ma·tured, ma·tur·ing.

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Origin of mature

First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English, from Latin mātūrus “ripe, timely, early”; akin to manes, matutinal

synonym study for mature

2. See ripe.

OTHER WORDS FROM mature

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

VOCAB BUILDER

What does mature mean?

If a person is mature, they act grown-up. If an animal is mature, it has reached adulthood. If a fruit is mature, it’s ripe. If a game or movie is intended for a mature audience, it means it’s for adults because it’s inappropriate for kids.

Mature has many meanings in addition to the common ones above. It is most commonly used as an adjective, but it can also be a verb meaning to become mature or to make mature.

Example: Some of my students are very mature and responsible, but the rest of them act like preschoolers.

Where does mature come from?

Mature comes from the Latin word mātūrus, meaning “‘ripe,” “timely,” or “early.” The first records of mature in English come from the 1400s.

Mature can mean a lot of different things. As a verb, mature can mean “to ripen,” as in This fruit will become softer as it matures. It is used in a similar way to refer to aging cheese, as in This cheese was matured for at least seven years. When applied to people, mature can mean “to grow and develop physically” or to “become more responsible and grown-up” (ideally both happen at the same time). Mature can also be used to mean “to make mature,” as in I hope college matures him. A child who has matured in such a way can then be called mature in terms of development and behavior.

As an adjective, mature has many more meanings, but most of them describe something that has reached an advanced stage of development or a final limit (as in mature industry and mature bond).

When applied to certain types of media, such as movies and video games, mature means “suitable only for adults.” This means it contains mature content, especially profanity or graphic depictions of sexual activity or violence. It is often used in this way for rating systems (as in This dictionary page is rated M for Mature).

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What are some other forms of mature?

What are some synonyms for mature?

What are some words that share a root or word element with mature

What are some words that often get used in discussing mature?

How is mature used in real life?

Mature can be used in many different ways. Most of them refer in some way to people or things that have reached a certain stage of development.

 

 

Try using mature!

Which of the following sentences uses mature incorrectly?

A. A mature strawberry should be bright red with green leaves.
B. Your mature behavior in class today was unacceptable—please try to act more grown-up.
C. This cheese is matured in caves to enhance its flavor.
D. The video game is for a mature audience due to its extreme violence.

Example sentences from the Web for mature

British Dictionary definitions for mature

mature
/ (məˈtjʊə, -ˈtʃʊə) /

adjective

verb

to make or become mature
(intr) (of notes, bonds, etc) to become due for payment or repayment

Derived forms of mature

maturely, adverbmatureness, noun

Word Origin for mature

C15: from Latin mātūrus early, developed
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for mature

mature
[ mə-chur, -tur ]

adj.

Having reached full natural growth or development.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of full mental or physical development.

v.

To evolve toward or reach full development.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.