definitions
  • synonyms

mild

[ mahyld ]
/ maɪld /
||
SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR mild ON THESAURUS.COM

adjective, mild·er, mild·est.

noun

British. beer that has a blander taste than bitter.

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RELATED WORDS

tepid, delicate, peaceful, sunny, balmy, breezy, benign, warm, weak, calm, smooth, bland, mellow, moderate, soft, cool, temperate, subdued, tame, gentle

Nearby words

milch, milch cow, milch glass, milchig, milchik, mild, mild mercurous chloride, mild silver protein, mild steel, milden, mildew

Origin of mild

before 900; Middle English, Old English milde; cognate with German mild; akin to Greek malthakós soft
SYNONYMS FOR mild
1 soft, pleasant. See gentle.
3 temperate, moderate, clement.
4 bland.
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for mild

British Dictionary definitions for mild

mild

/ (maɪld) /

adjective

(of a taste, sensation, etc) not powerful or strong; blanda mild curry
gentle or temperate in character, climate, behaviour, etc
not extreme; moderatea mild rebuke
feeble; unassertive

noun

British draught beer, of darker colour than bitter and flavoured with fewer hops
Derived Formsmildly, adverbmildness, noun

Word Origin for mild

Old English milde; compare Old Saxon mildi, Old Norse mildr
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for mild

mild


adj.

Old English milde "gentle, merciful," from Proto-Germanic *milthjaz- (cf. Old Norse mildr, Old Saxon mildi, Old Frisian milde, Middle Dutch milde, Dutch mild, Old High German milti, German milde "mild," Gothic mildiþa "kindness"), from PIE *meldh-, from root *mel- "soft," with derivatives referring to soft or softened materials (cf. Greek malthon "weakling," myle "mill;" Latin molere "to grind;" Old Irish meldach "tender;" Sanskrit mrdh "to neglect," also "to be moist"). Originally of persons and powers; of the weather from c.1400, of disease from 1744. Also in Old English as an adverb, "mercifully, graciously."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper