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View synonyms for mineral

mineral

1

[ min-er-uhl, min-ruhl ]

noun

  1. any of a class of substances occurring in nature, usually comprising inorganic substances, as quartz or feldspar, of definite chemical composition and usually of definite crystal structure, but sometimes also including rocks formed by these substances as well as certain natural products of organic origin, as asphalt or coal.
  2. a substance obtained by mining, as ore.
  3. (loosely) any substance that is neither animal nor vegetable.
  4. minerals, British. mineral water.
  5. Nutrition. any of the inorganic elements, as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, or sodium, that are essential to the functioning of the human body and are obtained from foods.


adjective

  1. of the nature of a mineral; pertaining to a mineral or minerals.
  2. containing or impregnated with a mineral or minerals.
  3. neither animal nor vegetable; inorganic:

    mineral matter.

mineral.

2

abbreviation for

  1. mineralogical.
  2. mineralogy.

mineral

1

/ ˈmɪnrəl; ˈmɪnərəl /

noun

  1. any of a class of naturally occurring solid inorganic substances with a characteristic crystalline form and a homogeneous chemical composition
  2. any inorganic matter
  3. any substance obtained by mining, esp a metal ore
  4. often plural short for mineral water
  5. a soft drink containing carbonated water and flavourings Usual US wordsoda


adjective

  1. of, relating to, containing, or resembling minerals

mineral.

2

abbreviation for

  1. mineralogy or mineralogical

mineral

/ mĭnər-əl /

  1. A naturally occurring, solid, inorganic element or compound having a uniform composition and a regularly repeating internal structure. Minerals typically have a characteristic hardness and color, or range of colors, by which they can be recognized. Rocks are made up of minerals.
  2. A natural substance of commercial value, such as iron ore, coal, or petroleum, that is obtained by mining, quarrying, or drilling.


mineral

  1. In geology , a naturally occurring inorganic substance ( see inorganic molecules ) with a definite chemical composition and a regular internal structure.


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Notes

Rocks are aggregates of minerals.
Most minerals are crystals , like salt and diamonds.

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Other Words From

  • non·miner·al noun adjective
  • semi·miner·al adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of mineral1

First recorded in 1375–1425; late Middle English, from Middle French, Old French mineral, from Medieval Latin minerāle (noun), minerālis (adjective), from miner(a) “mine, ore,” (from Vulgar Latin mināria (unrecorded); equivalent to mine 2 + -ary ) + -āle, -ālis -al 1

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Word History and Origins

Origin of mineral1

C15: from Medieval Latin minerāle (n), from minerālis (adj); related to minera mine, ore, of uncertain origin

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Example Sentences

Depending on the producer, Champagne can also be highly cloyingly sweet, buttery, or round, or mineral.

For example, a common type of meteorite has similar mineral content to Earth, but a lot less deuterium.

One more word about the mineral water industry in Marlin, Texas, and I was about to scream.

He enters a back room, sits at a round café table and sips from a bottle of mineral water.

Mining and Mineral Engineering: 90% male And here are the 10 least remunerative majors—where women prevail in nine out of ten: 1.

The essential point in which it differs from any other known mineral consists in its being at once fibrous and textile.

Certainly some of the uses to which this mineral is now being put are sufficiently astonishing.

About 1830 a miner, returned from South America, made a claim for wages for watching mineral left behind by Mr. Trevithick.

In these of the cereals it constitutes nearly half of their whole mineral components, and it rarely falls below 30 per cent.

In addition to these mineral substances, organic matters are also removed from solution.

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