monophonic

[mon-uh-fon-ik]
See more synonyms for monophonic on Thesaurus.com

Origin of monophonic

First recorded in 1880–85; monophon(y) + -ic
Related formsmon·o·phon·i·cal·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for monophonic

Historical Examples of monophonic

  • They were problems in monophonic style, and to these we must now turn our attention.

    How Music Developed

    W. J. Henderson

  • We have seen how the monophonic style—the melody with accompaniment—came in.

    How Music Developed

    W. J. Henderson

  • The prevailing melody of its monophonic style proved suitable to furnish a subject for the most animated discussion.

    For Every Music Lover

    Aubertine Woodward Moore

  • In short, his instrumental scores lean toward the polyphonic, rather than the monophonic style.

    How Music Developed

    W. J. Henderson

  • The reader will recollect what has already been said about the change from polyphonic to monophonic writing.

    How Music Developed

    W. J. Henderson


British Dictionary definitions for monophonic

monophonic

adjective
  1. Also: monaural (of a system of broadcasting, recording, or reproducing sound) using only one channel between source and loudspeakerSometimes shortened to: mono Compare stereophonic
  2. music of or relating to a style of musical composition consisting of a single melodic lineSee also monody (def. 3)
Derived Formsmonophony (mɒˈnɒfənɪ), noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for monophonic
adj.

of recordings, broadcasts, etc., "not stereo, having only one output signal," 1958, coined to be an opposite of stereophonic; from mono- + -phonic, from Greek phone "sound, voice" (see fame (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper