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“Evoke” and “invoke” both derive from the same Latin root “vocāre.”

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Origin of pan

1
First recorded before 900; Middle English, Old English panne; cognate with Dutch pan, German Pfanne, Old Norse panna; further origin uncertain, perhaps from assumed Vulgar Latin patna, panna “pan,” from Latin patena, patina “shallow dish, shallow pan, stewpan,” from Greek patánē “dish, flat dish.” Pan, in the sense “face,” is an Americanism first recorded in 1920–25; see origin at paten

OTHER WORDS FROM pan

panner, noun

Definition for pan (2 of 8)

pan2
[ pahn ]
/ pɑn /

noun

the leaf of the betel.
a substance, especially betel nut or a betel-nut mixture, used for chewing.

Origin of pan

2
First recorded in 1610–20; from Hindi pān; compare Pali, Prakrit paṇṇa, Sanskrit parṇa “leaf, betel leaf”

Definition for pan (3 of 8)

pan3
[ pan ]
/ pæn /

verb (used without object), panned, pan·ning.

to photograph or televise while rotating a camera on its vertical or horizontal axis in order to keep a moving person or object in view or allow the film to record a panorama: to pan from one end of the playing field to the other during the opening of the football game.
(of a camera) to be moved or manipulated in such a manner: The cameras panned occasionally during the scene.

verb (used with object), panned, pan·ning.

to move (a camera) in such a manner: to pan the camera across the scene.
to photograph or televise (a scene, moving character, etc.) by panning the camera.

noun

the act of panning a camera.
Also called panning shot. the filmed shot resulting from this.

Origin of pan

3
First recorded in 1920–25; shortening of panorama

Definition for pan (4 of 8)

pan4
[ pan ]
/ pæn /

noun

a major vertical division of a wall.
a nogged panel of half-timber construction.

Origin of pan

4
First recorded in 1735–45; from French, Middle French; see origin at pane

Definition for pan (5 of 8)

pan5
[ pahn ]
/ pɑn /

noun Informal.

Origin of pan

5
First recorded in 1935–40; by shortening

Definition for pan (6 of 8)

Pan
[ pan ]
/ pæn /

noun

the ancient Greek god of forests, pastures, flocks, and shepherds, represented with the head, chest, and arms of a man and the legs and sometimes the horns and ears of a goat.

Definition for pan (7 of 8)

pan-

a combining form meaning “all,” occurring originally in loanwords from Greek (panacea; panoply), but now used freely as a general formative (panleukopenia; panorama; pantelegraph; pantheism; pantonality), and especially in terms, formed at will, implying the union of all branches of a group (Pan-Christian; Panhellenic; Pan-Slavism). The hyphen and the second capital tend with longer use to be lost, unless they are retained in order to set off clearly the component parts.
Also pant-, panto- .

Origin of pan-

<Greek pan- combining form of pâs (neuter pân) all, every, pân everything

Definition for pan (8 of 8)

Pan.

abbreviation

Panama.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

WORDS THAT USE PAN-

What does pan- mean?

Pan- is a combining form used like a prefix meaning “all.” It is often used in a variety of scientific and technical terms, particularly in pathology.

Pan- comes from the Greek pâs, meaning “all.” The term pancreas, a gland in the stomach, is ultimately related to this same Greek root. So do panacea and many other words English gets from Greek. The equivalent form derived from Latin is omni-, as in omnivore, which comes from Latin omnis, “all.”

What are variants of pan-?

Pan- is a variant of panto-. Another variant of pan- is pant-, as in pantalgia. Want to know more? Read our Words That Use articles on pant- and panto-.

Examples of pan-

One example of a term you may have encountered that features the combining form pan- is pantheon, meaning “the gods of a particular mythology considered collectively.”

The pan- part of the word means “all,” while the -theon part of the word here means “god.” Pantheon has a literal sense of “all gods.”

What are some words that use the combining form pan-?

What are some other forms that pan- may be commonly confused with?

Not every word that begins with the exact letters pan-, such as pancake or panda, is necessarily using the combining form pan- to denote “all.” Learn where the word panda comes from at our entry for the word.

Break it down!

The combining form -gram means “something written.” With this in mind, how many letters of the alphabet are used in a sentence known as a pangram?

How to use pan in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for pan (1 of 6)

pan1
/ (pæn) /

noun

verb pans, panning or panned

See also pan out

Word Origin for pan

Old English panne; related to Old Saxon, Old Norse panna, Old High German pfanna

British Dictionary definitions for pan (2 of 6)

pan2
/ (pæn) /

verb pans, panning or panned

to move (a film camera) or (of a film camera) to be moved so as to follow a moving object or obtain a panoramic effect

noun

  1. the act of panning
  2. (as modifier)a pan shot

Word Origin for pan

C20: shortened from panoramic

British Dictionary definitions for pan (3 of 6)

pan3

paan (pɑːn)

/ (pæn) /

noun

the leaf of the betel tree
a preparation of this leaf which is chewed, together with betel nuts and lime, in India and the East Indies

Word Origin for pan

C17: from Hindi, from Sanskrit parna feather, wing, leaf

British Dictionary definitions for pan (4 of 6)

Pan
/ (pæn) /

noun

Greek myth the god of fields, woods, shepherds, and flocks, represented as a man with a goat's legs, horns, and earsRelated adjectives: Pandean, Panic

British Dictionary definitions for pan (5 of 6)

pan-

combining form

all or everypanchromatic
including or relating to all parts or membersPan-African; pantheistic

Word Origin for pan-

from Greek pan, neuter of pas all

British Dictionary definitions for pan (6 of 6)

Pan.

abbreviation for

Panama
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for pan

pan-

pref.

All:panagglutinins.
General; whole:panimmunity.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Cultural definitions for pan

Pan

The Greek god of flocks, forests, meadows, and shepherds. He had the horns and feet of a goat. Pan frolicked about the landscape, playing delightful tunes.

notes for Pan

Pan's musical instrument was a set of reed pipes, the “pipes of Pan.”

notes for Pan

According to legend, Pan was the source of scary noises in the wilderness at night. Fright at these noises was called “panic.”
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with pan

pan

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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