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View synonyms for pip

pip

1

[ pip ]

noun

  1. one of the spots on dice, playing cards, or dominoes:

    You need to match the two pips on this domino with two pips on one of your dominoes.

  2. each of the small segments into which the surface of a pineapple is divided:

    Cut off the top of the pineapple, slicing through the first row of pips.

  3. Informal. metal insigne of rank on the shoulders of commissioned officers:

    the museum's collection of German pips and buttons.

  4. Horticulture.
    1. an individual rootstock of a plant, especially of the lily of the valley:

      This low-growing perennial forms dense clumps from its slender pips.

    2. a portion of the rootstock or root of several other plants:

      The peony's pips are those budlike growths at the top of the tuber.



pip

2

[ pip ]

noun

  1. Veterinary Pathology: Older Use. a contagious disease of birds, especially poultry, characterized by the secretion of a thick mucus in the mouth and throat:

    The last thing they wanted to find in the henhouse was a chicken with pip.

  2. Facetious. Usually the pip. any minor or unspecified ailment in a person:

    Oh, no, not that annoying neighbor—he gives me the pip.

pip

3

[ pip ]

noun

  1. a small seed, especially of a fleshy fruit, as an apple or orange:

    Does the juicer remove the pips or just grind them up?

  2. Also called pipperoo. Informal. someone or something wonderful:

    Last night's party was a pip.

pip

4

[ pip ]

verb (used without object)

, pipped, pip·ping.
  1. to peep or chirp:

    Listen to those chicks pip!

  2. (of a hatching bird) to break out from the shell:

    How long before the eaglets start pipping?

verb (used with object)

, pipped, pip·ping.
  1. to crack or chip a hole through (the shell), as a hatching bird:

    All but one of the new brood has pipped through their shells.

pip

5

[ pip ]

noun

, Electronics.
  1. observing the radar screen for unusual pips.

pip

6

[ pip ]

verb (used with object)

, British Slang.
, pipped, pip·ping.
  1. to blackball:

    Are you telling me I've been pipped from the entire music industry?

  2. to defeat (an opponent):

    No one expected our team to pip those hotshots from Birmingham.

  3. to shoot, especially to wound or kill by a gunshot:

    Get that pistol out of here before someone gets pipped.

Pip

7

[ pip ]

noun

  1. a male given name, form of Philip.

pip

1

/ pɪp /

noun

  1. a contagious disease of poultry characterized by the secretion of thick mucus in the mouth and throat
  2. facetious.
    a minor human ailment
  3. slang.
    a bad temper or depression (esp in the phrase give ( someone ) the pip )
  4. get the pip or have the pip informal.
    to sulk


verb

  1. slang.
    to cause to be annoyed or depressed

pip

2

/ pɪp /

noun

  1. the seed of a fleshy fruit, such as an apple or pear
  2. any of the segments marking the surface of a pineapple
  3. a rootstock or flower of the lily of the valley or certain other plants

pip

3

/ pɪp /

verb

  1. to wound or kill, esp with a gun
  2. to defeat (a person), esp when his success seems certain (often in the phrase pip at the post )
  3. to blackball or ostracize

pip

4

/ pɪp /

noun

  1. a short high-pitched sound, a sequence of which can act as a time signal, esp on radio
  2. a radar blip
    1. a spot or single device, such as a spade, diamond, heart, or club on a playing card
    2. any of the spots on dice or dominoes
  3. informal.
    Also calledstar the emblem worn on the shoulder by junior officers in the British Army, indicating their rank

verb

  1. of a young bird
    1. intr to chirp; peep
    2. to pierce (the shell of its egg) while hatching
  2. intr to make a short high-pitched sound
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Word History and Origins

Origin of pip1

First recorded in 1590–1600; earlier peep; origin uncertain

Origin of pip2

First recorded in 1375–1425; late Middle English pippe, from Middle Dutch, from unattested Vulgar Latin pipita, for Latin pītuīta “phlegm, pip”

Origin of pip3

First recorded in 1590–1600; 1910–15 pip 3fordef 2; short for pippin

Origin of pip4

First recorded in 1650–60; variant of peep 2

Origin of pip5

First recorded in 1940–45; imitative

Origin of pip6

First recorded in 1875–80; perhaps special use of pip 1, in metaphorical sense of a small ball
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Word History and Origins

Origin of pip1

C15: from Middle Dutch pippe, ultimately from Latin pituita phlegm; see pituitary

Origin of pip2

C18: short for pippin

Origin of pip3

C19 (originally in the sense: to blackball): probably from pip ²

Origin of pip4

C16 (in the sense: spot or speck); C17 (vb); C20 (in the sense: short high-pitched sound): of obscure, probably imitative origin; senses 1 and 5 are probably related to peep ²
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Example Sentences

A very young Gladys Knight, already possessed of a very big voice, storms the stage with her Pips.

From Time

And then there was Pip, the boy in the novel who also falls in love with her.

But it took another 20 years for his son, Owen “Pip” Brennan, Jr. to make the Krewe synonymous with Mardi Gras.

Pip walking down the hallway of her adolescence sporting unromantic hair.

The allusion is to a game of cards called one-and-thirty; thirty-two is a pip too many.

He told them that at Railhead were many bad pip-ple, who swore, and drank a great deal more than was good for them.

It spreads rapidly, sending up a flower-stalk from every "pip."

There's Miss Pamela, that ought to be goin' to be married a week from next Tuesday, goin' round as mopy as a chicken wid the pip.

All this time he was tilting poor Pip backwards till he was dreadfully frightened and giddy.

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