ransom

[ ran-suhm ]
/ ˈræn səm /

noun

the redemption of a prisoner, slave, or kidnapped person, of captured goods, etc., for a price.
the sum or price paid or demanded.
a means of deliverance or rescue from punishment for sin, especially the payment of a redemptive fine.

verb (used with object)

to redeem from captivity, bondage, detention, etc., by paying a demanded price.
to release or restore on receipt of a ransom.
to deliver or redeem from punishment for sin.

Origin of ransom

1150–1200; (noun) Middle English ransoun < Old French rançon < Late Latin redēmptiōn- (stem of redēmptiō) redemption; (v.) Middle English ransounen < Old French rançonner, derivative of rançon
Related formsran·som·er, nounun·ran·somed, adjective

Definition for ransom (2 of 2)

Ransom

[ ran-suh m ]
/ ˈræn səm /

noun

John Crowe [kroh] /kroʊ/, 1888–1974, U.S. poet, critic, and teacher.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for ransom

British Dictionary definitions for ransom (1 of 2)

ransom

/ (ˈrænsəm) /

noun

verb (tr)

Derived Formsransomer, noun

Word Origin for ransom

C14: from Old French ransoun, from Latin redemptiō a buying back, redemption

British Dictionary definitions for ransom (2 of 2)

Ransom

/ (ˈrænsəm) /

noun

John Crowe . 1888–1974, US poet and critic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with ransom

ransom


see king's ransom.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.