ratify

[rat-uh-fahy]

verb (used with object), rat·i·fied, rat·i·fy·ing.

to confirm by expressing consent, approval, or formal sanction: to ratify a constitutional amendment.
to confirm (something done or arranged by an agent or by representatives) by such action.

Origin of ratify

1325–75; Middle English ratifien < Middle French ratifier < Medieval Latin ratificāre, equivalent to Latin rat(us) calculated (see rate1) + -ificāre -ify
Related formsrat·i·fi·er, nounnon·rat·i·fy·ing, adjectiveun·rat·i·fied, adjective

Synonyms for ratify

Antonyms for ratify

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for ratified

Contemporary Examples of ratified

Historical Examples of ratified

  • The oaths were ratified by the sacrifice of a bull, a wolf , a boar, and a ram over a shield.

    Anabasis

    Xenophon

  • Upon the committee's return to Philadelphia, its actions were ratified by Congress.

  • Kerry responded to the sentiment with a fac-simile sigh, and the peace was ratified.

    The O'Donoghue

    Charles James Lever

  • On October 17, 1803, the Senate ratified the treaty by a vote of twenty-four to seven.

    Union and Democracy

    Allen Johnson

  • This will was ratified by Augustus with the exception of the title given to Archelaus.

    Jesus the Christ

    James Edward Talmage


British Dictionary definitions for ratified

ratify

verb -fies, -fying or -fied

(tr) to give formal approval or consent to
Derived Formsratifiable, adjectiveratification, nounratifier, noun

Word Origin for ratify

C14: via Old French from Latin ratus fixed (see rate 1) + facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ratified

ratify

v.

mid-14c., from Old French ratifier (13c.), from Medieval Latin ratificare "confirm, approve," literally "fix by reckoning," from Latin ratus "fixed by calculation; determined; approved; certain, sure; valid" (past participle adjective from reri "to reckon, think;" see reason (v.)) + root of facere "to make" (see factitious). Related: Ratified; ratifying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper