definitions
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rotten

[ rot-n ]
/ ˈrɒt n /
||
SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR rotten ON THESAURUS.COM

adjective, rot·ten·er, rot·ten·est.

decomposing or decaying; putrid; tainted, foul, or bad-smelling.
corrupt or morally offensive.
wretchedly bad, unpleasant, or unsatisfactory; miserable: a rotten piece of work; a rotten day at the office.
contemptible; despicable: a rotten little liar; a rotten trick.
(of soil, rocks, etc.) soft, yielding, or friable as the result of decomposition.
Australian Slang. drunk.

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RELATED WORDS

putrid, rotting, disgusting, rancid, noxious, sour, spoiled, corrupt, moldy, stale, overripe, crooked, unpleasant, unlucky, lousy, diseased, crummy, amiss, nasty, dirty

Nearby words

rototome, rotovate, rotproof, rotta, rotte, rotten, rotten apple, rotten borough, rotten egg, rotten ice, rotten to the core

Origin of rotten

1175–1225; Middle English roten < Old Norse rotinn, past participle of an unrecorded verb meaning “to rot”
SYNONYMS FOR rotten
Related formsrot·ten·ly, adverbrot·ten·ness, nounhalf-rot·ten, adjectiveun·rot·ten, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for rotten

British Dictionary definitions for rotten

rotten

/ (ˈrɒtən) /

adjective

adverb informal

extremely; very muchmen fancy her rotten
Derived Formsrottenly, adverbrottenness, noun

Word Origin for rotten

C13: from Old Norse rottin; related to Old English rotian to rot 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for rotten

rotten


adj.

c.1300, from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse rotinn "decayed," past participle of verb related to rotna "to decay," from Proto-Germanic stem *rut- (see rot (v.)). Sense of "corrupt" is from late 14c.; weakened sense of "bad" first recorded 1881. Rotten apple is from a saying traced back to at least 1528: "For one rotten apple lytell and lytell putrifieth an whole heape." The Rotten Row in London and elsewhere probably is from a different word, but of uncertain origin.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper