scar

1
[ skahr ]
/ skɑr /

noun

a mark left by a healed wound, sore, or burn.
a lasting aftereffect of trouble, especially a lasting psychological injury resulting from suffering or trauma.
any blemish remaining as a trace of or resulting from injury or use.
Botany. a mark indicating a former point of attachment, as where a leaf has fallen from a stem.

verb (used with object), scarred, scar·ring.

to mark with a scar.

verb (used without object), scarred, scar·ring.

to form a scar in healing.

Origin of scar

1
1350–1400; Middle English; aphetic variant of eschar

Related forms

scar·less, adjectiveun·scarred, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for scarred

British Dictionary definitions for scarred (1 of 2)

scar

1
/ (skɑː) /

noun

any mark left on the skin or other tissue following the healing of a wound
a permanent change in a person's character resulting from emotional distresshis wife's death left its scars on him
the mark on a plant indicating the former point of attachment of a part, esp the attachment of a leaf to a stem
a mark of damage; blemish

verb scars, scarring or scarred

to mark or become marked with a scar
(intr) to heal leaving a scar

Word Origin for scar

C14: via Late Latin from Greek eskhara scab

British Dictionary definitions for scarred (2 of 2)

scar

2
/ (skɑː) /

noun

an irregular enlongated trench-like feature on a land surface that often exposes bedrock
a similar formation in a river or sea
Also called (Scot): scaur

Word Origin for scar

C14: from Old Norse sker low reef, skerry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for scarred

scar

[ skär ]

n.

The fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue destroyed by injury or disease.

v.

To mark with a scar or become marked with a scar.
To form scar.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.