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stoke1

[stohk]
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verb (used with object), stoked, stok·ing.
  1. to poke, stir up, and feed (a fire).
  2. to tend the fire of (a furnace, especially one used with a boiler to generate steam for an engine); supply with fuel.
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verb (used without object), stoked, stok·ing.
  1. to shake up the coals of a fire.
  2. to tend a fire or furnace.
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Origin of stoke1

1675–85; < Dutch stoken to feed or stock a fire; see stock
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words

feedstirpoketend

Examples from the Web for stoking

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • One was stoking and the other was vehemently urging him to greater effort.

  • And the foolish youth, at that, straightway fell to stoking the fire.

    The Prairie Child

    Arthur Stringer

  • There were no tremors, no rumblings from the hidden furnace, only the flare of its stoking.

    A Man to His Mate

    J. Allan Dunn

  • At present the one is burned out and the other is only just stoking up.

    From Sea to Sea

    Rudyard Kipling

  • Bindle was thorough in all things, especially in the matter of stoking.

    Mrs. Bindle

    Hebert Jenkins


British Dictionary definitions for stoking

stoke

verb
  1. to feed, stir, and tend (a fire, furnace, etc)
  2. (tr) to tend the furnace of; act as a stoker for
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See also stoke up

Word Origin

C17: back formation from stoker
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for stoking

stoke

v.

1650s (implied in stoker), "to feed and stir up a fire in a fireplace," from Dutch stoken "to stoke," from Middle Dutch stoken "to poke, thrust," related to stoc "stick, stump," from Proto-Germanic *stok-, variant of *stik-, *stek- "pierce, prick" (see stick (v.)). Stoked "enthusiastic" recorded in surfer slang by 1963, but the extension of the word to persons is older:

Having "stoked up," as the men called it, the brigades paraded at 10.30 a.m., ready for the next stage of the march. ["Cassell's History of the Boer War," 1901]
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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

stoking in Medicine

stoke

(stōk)
n.
  1. A unit of kinematic viscosity equal to that of a fluid with a viscosity of one poise and a density of one gram per milliliter.
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The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.