study

[ stuhd-ee ]
/ ˈstʌd i /

noun, plural stud·ies.

verb (used without object), stud·ied, stud·y·ing.

verb (used with object), stud·ied, stud·y·ing.

Origin of study

1250–1300; (noun) Middle English studie < Old French estudie < Latin studium, equivalent to stud(ēre) to be busy with, devote oneself to, concentrate on + -ium -ium; (v.) Middle English studien < Old French estudier < Medieval Latin studiāre, derivative of studium

SYNONYMS FOR study

11 library, den.
21 Study, consider, reflect, weigh imply fixing the mind upon something, generally doing so with a view to some decision or action. Study implies an attempt to obtain a grasp of something by methodical or exhaustive thought: to study a problem. To consider is to fix the thought upon something and give it close attention before making a decision concerning it, or beginning an action connected with it: to consider ways and means. Reflect implies looking back quietly over past experience and giving it consideration: to reflect on similar cases in the past. Weigh implies a deliberate and judicial estimate, as by a balance: to weigh a decision.

OTHER WORDS FROM study

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for studiers

study
/ (ˈstʌdɪ) /

verb studies, studying or studied

noun plural studies

Word Origin for study

C13: from Old French estudie, from Latin studium zeal, inclination, from studēre to be diligent
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for studiers

study
[ stŭdē ]

n.

Research, detailed examination, or analysis of an organism, object, or phenomenon.

v.

To research, examine, or analyze something.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with studiers

study

see brown study.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.