unlimited

[uhn-lim-i-tid]
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adjective
  1. not limited; unrestricted; unconfined: unlimited trade.
  2. boundless; infinite; vast: the unlimited skies.
  3. without any qualification or exception; unconditional.

Origin of unlimited

late Middle English word dating back to 1400–50; see origin at un-1, limited
Related formsun·lim·it·ed·ly, adverb

Synonyms for unlimited

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1. unconstrained, unrestrained, unfettered.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for unlimited

Contemporary Examples of unlimited

Historical Examples of unlimited

  • In the horse's mind this sort of thing was associated with unlimited punishment.

    Thoroughbreds

    W. A. Fraser

  • In the unlimited power of her magnetism, what a trifle she had asked of him!

    Thoroughbreds

    W. A. Fraser

  • They have societies and clubs and unlimited tea-fights where all the guests are girls.

    American Notes

    Rudyard Kipling

  • It is associated with armies and navies, and an unlimited police force.

  • That is to say, it may be supposed that he got all he wanted, otherwise with unlimited wealth he would have got it.

    Little Dorrit

    Charles Dickens


British Dictionary definitions for unlimited

unlimited

adjective
  1. without limits or boundsunlimited knowledge
  2. not restricted, limited, or qualifiedunlimited power
  3. finance, British
    1. (of liability) not restricted to any unpaid portion of nominal capital invested in a business
    2. (of a business enterprise) having owners with such unlimited liability
Derived Formsunlimitedly, adverbunlimitedness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unlimited
adj.

mid-15c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of limit (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper