vacate

[ vey-keyt or, esp. British, vuh-keyt, vey- ]
/ ˈveɪ keɪt or, esp. British, vəˈkeɪt, veɪ- /

verb (used with object), va·cat·ed, va·cat·ing.

to give up possession or occupancy of: to vacate an apartment.
to give up or relinquish (an office, position, etc.): to vacate the presidency of a firm.
to render inoperative; deprive of validity; void; annul: to vacate a legal judgment.
to cause to be empty or unoccupied; make vacant: to vacate one's mind of worries.

verb (used without object), va·cat·ed, va·cat·ing.

Origin of vacate

1635–45; < Latin vacātus past participle of vacāre to be empty; see -ate1

Related forms

va·cat·a·ble, adjectivepre·va·cate, verb (used with object), pre·va·cat·ed, pre·va·cat·ing.re·va·cate, verb (used with object), re·va·cat·ed, re·va·cat·ing.un·va·cat·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for vacating

British Dictionary definitions for vacating

vacate

/ (vəˈkeɪt) /

verb (mainly tr)

to cause (something) to be empty, esp by departing from or abandoning itto vacate a room
(also intr) to give up the tenure, possession, or occupancy of (a place, post, etc); leave or quit
law
  1. to cancel or rescind
  2. to make void or of no effect; annul

Derived Forms

vacatable, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012