wag

[ wag ]
/ wæg /

verb (used with object), wagged, wag·ging.

verb (used without object), wagged, wag·ging.

noun

the act of wagging: a friendly wag of the tail.
a person given to droll, roguish, or mischievous humor; wit.

Origin of wag

1175–1225; Middle English waggen < Old Norse vaga to sway, or vagga cradle
Related formswag·ger, nounun·wagged, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for wagger

  • They say on Sunday afternoon the Wagger makes the same speech to the freshers that he's made for twenty years.

    Sinister Street, vol. 2|Compton Mackenzie

British Dictionary definitions for wagger (1 of 4)

wag

1
/ (wæɡ) /

verb wags, wagging or wagged

to move or cause to move rapidly and repeatedly from side to side or up and down
to move (the tongue) or (of the tongue) to be moved rapidly in talking, esp in idle gossip
to move (the finger) or (of the finger) to be moved from side to side, in or as in admonition
slang to play truant (esp in the phrase wag it)

noun

the act or an instance of wagging

Word Origin for wag

C13: from Old English wagian to shake; compare Old Norse vagga cradle

British Dictionary definitions for wagger (2 of 4)

wag

2
/ (wæɡ) /

noun

a humorous or jocular person; wit

Derived Formswaggery, nounwaggish, adjectivewaggishly, adverbwaggishness, noun

Word Origin for wag

C16: of uncertain origin

British Dictionary definitions for wagger (3 of 4)

Wag

/ (wæɡ) /

noun

informal the wife or girlfriend of a famous sportsman

Word Origin for Wag

C21: a back formation from an acronym for w (ives) a (nd) g (irlfriends)

British Dictionary definitions for wagger (4 of 4)

WAG

abbreviation for

(West Africa) Gambia (international car registration)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with wagger

wag

see tail wagging the dog; tongues wag.


The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.