choice

[ chois ]
/ tʃɔɪs /

noun

adjective, choic·er, choic·est.

Idioms

    of choice, that is generally preferred: A detached house is still the home of choice.

Origin of choice

1250–1300; Middle English chois < Old French, derivative of choisir to perceive, choose < Germanic; see choose

Related forms

choice·less, adjectivechoice·ly, adverbchoice·ness, nounpre·choice, noun

Synonym study

2. Choice, alternative, option, preference all suggest the power of choosing between things. Choice implies the opportunity to choose: a choice of evils. Alternative suggests that one has a choice between only two possibilities. It is often used with a negative to mean that there is no second possibility: to have no alternative. Option emphasizes free right or privilege of choosing: to exercise one's option. Preference applies to a choice based on liking or partiality: to state a preference. 9. See fine1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for choices

British Dictionary definitions for choices

choice

/ (tʃɔɪs) /

noun

adjective

Derived Forms

choicely, adverbchoiceness, noun

Word Origin for choice

C13: from Old French chois, from choisir to choose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with choices

choice


see by choice; Hobson's choice; of choice; pays your money and takes your choice. Also see under choose.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.