cornucopia

[ kawr-nuh-koh-pee-uh, -nyuh- ]
/ ˌkɔr nəˈkoʊ pi ə, -nyə- /

noun

Classical Mythology. a horn containing food, drink, etc., in endless supply, said to have been a horn of the goat Amalthaea.
a representation of this horn, used as a symbol of abundance.
an abundant, overflowing supply.
a horn-shaped or conical receptacle or ornament.

VIDEO FOR CORNUCOPIA

WATCH NOW: What Exactly Is A Cornucopia?

It’s Thanksgiving, you’re sitting around the table, the food is coming out, and you look up, salivating, only to see a giant horn full of fruits and veggies sitting in the middle of the table. Why is this here, and what does it mean?

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Origin of cornucopia

1585–95; < Late Latin, equivalent to Latin cornū horn (see cornu) + cōpiae of plenty (genitive stem of cōpia); see copious

OTHER WORDS FROM cornucopia

cor·nu·co·pi·an, adjectivecor·nu·co·pi·ate [kawr-nuh-koh-pee-it] /ˌkɔr nəˈkoʊ pi ɪt/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for cornucopia

British Dictionary definitions for cornucopia

cornucopia
/ (ˌkɔːnjʊˈkəʊpɪə) /

noun

Greek myth the horn of Amalthea, the goat that suckled Zeus
a representation of such a horn in painting, sculpture, etc, overflowing with fruit, vegetables, etc; horn of plenty
a great abundance; overflowing supply
a horn-shaped container

Derived forms of cornucopia

cornucopian, adjective

Word Origin for cornucopia

C16: from Late Latin, from Latin cornūcōpiae horn of plenty
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012