encompass

[en-kuhm-puh s]
See more synonyms for encompass on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object)
  1. to form a circle about; encircle; surround: He built a moat to encompass the castle.
  2. to enclose; envelop: The folds of a great cloak encompassed her person.
  3. to include comprehensively: a work that encompasses the entire range of the world's religious beliefs.
  4. Obsolete. to outwit.

Origin of encompass

First recorded in 1545–55; en-1 + compass
Related formsen·com·pass·ment, nounun·en·com·passed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for encompass

Contemporary Examples of encompass

Historical Examples of encompass

  • Newbury's delight in her, his tender worship of her, seemed to enwrap and encompass her.

    The Coryston Family

    Mrs. Humphry Ward

  • You encompass the earth with one particular spot of it in your eye.

  • But machines could not hope to encompass all the irrationality of Man.

    Mezzerow Loves Company

    Floyd L. Wallace

  • Fly, fly, pretty cloud, and encompass yon pavilion with your form.

    Ixion In Heaven

    Benjamin Disraeli

  • Let us transform and amplify that power and we encompass—destruction.


British Dictionary definitions for encompass

encompass

verb (tr)
  1. to enclose within a circle; surround
  2. to bring about; cause to happen; contrivehe encompassed the enemy's ruin
  3. to include entirely or comprehensivelythis book encompasses the whole range of knowledge
Derived Formsencompassment, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for encompass
v.

1550s, from en- (1) "make, put in" + compass. Related: Encompassed; encompasses; encompassing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper